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Julius Caesar - Shakespeare develops tension in the lead up to Caesars death in a number of different ways.

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Introduction

Chris Worrall 11B/L Julius Caesar Shakespeare develops tension in the lead up to Caesars death in a number of different ways. In act one scene 1, Shakespeare creates tension when Marrullus accuses and insults the Roman crowd of forgetting their true hero Pompey; on line 33 he says "you Blocks, you Stones, you worse than senseless things!" this would have made some of the Roman crowd angry maybe at Caesar. The soothsayer in act 1 scene 2 line 17 tells Caesar to "Bewared the ides of March", although Caesar was too arrogant to listen to the soothsayer, this would have created tension in the Elizabethan audience as they believed strongly in superstition. Cassius is a jealous character; he was jealous and envious of Caesars power, for example when Caesar was ill in Spain, line scene 1 line128 he was "as a sick girl" Cassius believes the head of the Roman empire should not be weak like Caesar who is regarded so highly "like a colossus" in line 136 or line 129 "Feeble temper" and that Caesar is leading Rome alone, line 130 "bear the palm alone". ...read more.

Middle

Brutus believes that Cesar will climb "Young ambitions ladder" line 22 a metaphor meaning that when Cesar gradually gets more and more power he will climb higher up the ladder he will become too powerful and may use his power for other reasons than the good of Rome. There is evidence for this in line 30-31 "That he is augmented would run to these extremities". When Brutus received the letter he reminds himself, line 40 "Is not tomorrow, boy, the ides of March", but more importantly is Cassius letter which has reinforced Brutus' intentions. Brutus is introduced to the other conspirators and Decius says in line 155 "Shall no man else man else be touched, but only Cesar?". Cassius disagrees with this and thinks Mark Anthony should also be killed line, 156-157 "I think it is not meet, Mark Anthony so well beloved of Cesar should outlive Cesar." this is a very tense part of the play. Then Brutus says the conspiracy will become too bloody, line 162 "Our cause will seem too bloody" even though Cassius fears Anthony, line 184 "Yet I fear him" he changes his mind so Brutus will still be a part of the conspiracy. ...read more.

Conclusion

Shakespeare introduces the soothsayer at the end of act 2, this is very successful because he is speaking to Portia who has knowledge of the conspiracy and she is told to increase her fears, and this would have had the audience on the edge of their seats. The tension between Cassius and Caesar is useful because Shakespeare builds up Cassius' jealousy into a conspiracy and murder. Shakespeare makes his play scandalous when he uses Brutus, Caesars best friend to turn against him, and plot to kill him. The play has a lot of tension, when the conspirators are getting ready to kill Caesar, the letter from Artemidorus and Calphurnias dream almost reveals the conspiracy. It is my opinion that the letter is the most tense part of the play because Caesar could have had all the conspirators tried and killed, it made me feel nervous on Caesars behalf, and is a very effective part of the play. Shakespeare uses different locations and setting to scare and worry the Elizabethan audience, for example he uses a storm to portray evil that is being planned by the conspirators. ...read more.

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