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Lord of the Flies

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Introduction

Jessica Johnson 10h 7th June 2006 Lord of the Flies Coursework essay Question 13- "Show how Golding creates a world of increasing violence in the novel Lord of the Flies is an allegorical novel, written shortly after the Second World War. It tells a story of school boys deserted on a island , and their struggle to manage, by an omniscient narrator who comments on setting and movement. This is similar to the story of Coral Island, however Golding is challenging the ideas in this, instead of the boys resorting to team work and success like expected, they resort to activism and create a environment of "increasing violence". By purposely setting the novel on a isolated island Golding can show his impression of the true nature of humans, and that he believes they would act sadistically and slowly become more and more distant from any means of civilisation. Golding manages to create a small world and community filled with violence by the end of the novel through a number of aspects; the settings, the characters and their behaviour, events, and general themes that run through the novel. Golding purposely sets his novel Lord of the flies on an isolated island so the boy's natural behaviour can emerge when taken away from rules or boundaries. ...read more.

Middle

The boys increasingly lose their moral values and innocence in the novel, this is shadowed by the way the conch loses it's colour. The antagonist Jack could be seen as Golding's main tool that increases the boy's use of violence in the microcosm setting. Jack is first described as wearing black and having "red" hair, these colours could be symbolic of the devil and relevant to Golding's themes of evil. He becomes the chief after Ralph and leads the boys to act savage like and use violence towards each other, and to hunt. Jack is shown to have a lust for hunting as it gives him a sense of power, and pleasure, it becomes clear through his character the evil that can be latent within man kinds character. Because of the literal period that Lord of the Flies was written in, Jack could be seen as a representative of Hitler as he constantly uses violence and increases the use of it in others; this makes him essential to Golding's increasing of violence in the novel for example his first prime instinct in the novel was to hunt. The use of hunting, violence and unkindness the boys use continues to grow through out the novel, by chapter nine all the boys are involved in a ritual dance which results in the "accidental" killing of Simon. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the final chapter the boys are finally rescued, ironically it isn't by the signal fire as the aspect of that was taken over by savagery and violence. However it is a fire that is symbolic of violence as the use of it was meant to help kill Ralph. However it summons a ship, when the boys are met once again with a well groomed civilised human, they are described by the omniscient narrator as little boys and their use of violence disappears. Heightened by the character Percival who at the beginning of the novel could say his name and address, however by the end has completely forgotten his true identity. "Ralph wept for the end of innocence" the tears that Ralph weeps could be symbolic of his realisation of failure to fight the evil within man kind. Ralph can no longer see the world as a secure safe place where violence won't be used against him, as he has seen it increase and the pleasure from it overtake people. When looking at the full grown groomed adult compared to the dirty "little boys" in front of him, it is ironic that the little boys now have more knowledge about the innate desire within all man kind. Jessica Johnson Jessica Johnson ...read more.

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