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Lord of the Flies by William Golding does just that! Golding, using symbolism, shows his readers ideas about human nature that are rarely thought about in society.

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Introduction

A book that makes a person think is always more interesting than a book that does not. Lord of the Flies by William Golding does just that! Golding, using symbolism, shows his readers ideas about human nature that are rarely thought about in society. In this allegorical piece of literature he uses objects and characters as symbols. Each important object in the book is closely related to a character in the book. For example, the conch and Ralph are closely connected, also Piggy and his glasses are directly associated. Lastly, the Lord of the Flies, which could be a character or an object, has a great affect on Simon and Jack. William Golding's symbolism creates tension that keeps his readers wondering what will happen as this group of once civilized boys turn to their instincts. One can easily see the symbolism in the conch, with Ralph representing all of the same things. Like the conch, Ralph symbolizes authority, order, respect and leadership. The conch can be seen as a simple object, but it is more fascinating to look at it as a tool used by Ralph. ...read more.

Middle

At the beginning of the book, the shell is almost perfect. The one imperfection is a small scratch, which is a foreshadowing of what will eventually happen to the boys' society. The conch gets more and more scratched up, it loses its beautiful pink shade; and right before Piggy's death the conch is shattered, symbolizing the complete loss of order in society. Ralph changes as the conch does. Ralph starts off believing that he is living in a perfect place where everything is wonderful. By the end he is running for his life. If he hadn't been rescued at that exact moment, then he probably would have been overcome by the evil instincts that unconsciously imprisoned the other boys. Like Ralph and the conch, Piggy and his glasses fundamentally are symbolic of the same thing. The glasses, when possessed by Piggy, represent the knowledge to "see" what is right, or what is best. In the Bible, in the story of Abraham, Abraham is constantly referred to as a seer, or the one who sees. ...read more.

Conclusion

This unusual demon inhabits the souls of the young boys and corrupts them. As the boys are oblivious to everything, the demon turns the boys into savages with evil instincts that are uncontrollable. The evil spirit has the greatest effect on Jack, who already overflowing with emotion cannot handle his feelings and becomes a savage beast. The only character who is aware of the Lord of the Flies is Simon. Simon is connected with his true feelings. He sees a once perfect society being changed into hell. Simon finally meets the devil of this hellhole, and sees that his enemy is undefeatable, uncontrollable, and unbearable. It seems as if he almost commits suicide as he is slaughtered by the savage boys who are anxious for a kill. The Lord of the Flies is important because it shows that Golding believes in the evil nature that all human beings possess. Ralph has authority with his conch, Piggy can "see" with his glasses, and Simon has a revelation with a devil. These characters and their vital objects are symbols as well as important pieces of the story. Golding uses symbolism to add tension to a book already overflowing with thought and emotion that keeps his readers on the edge of their seats. ...read more.

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