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Lord of the Flies Coursework A consideration of the ways in which a sense of pessimism about human nature is conveyed in the first four chapters of 'Lord of the Flies'.

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Introduction

Lord of the Flies Coursework A consideration of the ways in which a sense of pessimism about human nature is conveyed in the first four chapters of 'Lord of the Flies'. William Golding's 'Lord of the Flies' was based primarily on the book 'Coral Island' in which children find an island and live there in Utopia. Golding's thoughts on this were that it simply couldn't be done; so he creates a Utopia; a paradise for young boys to take refuge as a plane crash leaves them stranded. They are safe and in a place where everything is perfect as their nature slowly tilts them to their own instinct; their basic survival code. These boys become almost animal; their vicious potential for evil shines through. Within this novel there is an incredible amount of pessimism of human nature. Golding brings to life the reality of life, that there is evil inside of us; just waiting to unfold. The author brings across this negative image of human nature mainly by showing the development of the main characters, for instance Jack, Ralph and Roger and how the sense of evil is brought to reality in what these people do and say. Even the island itself promotes Dystopia, sure at times it may be beautiful and perfect but as the atmosphere changes; so does the scenery. ...read more.

Middle

Through bullying and destruction; killing and hurting for unjustified reasons. It shows us that there is an animal in all of us; just waiting to be unleashed. "Jack slashed at one with his knife . . .'green candles' said Jack contemptuously 'We can't eat them. Come on.'" Jack doesn't like anything that isn't worth something; if you cannot eat it, then it doesn't exist in his mind. He cannot take the beauty of something; just for its beauty. So Jack destroys it; the green candles are not worth anything. Golding uses symbolism here; the green candles are the beauty and wonder within life; Jack: the destroyer within life. Destruction is a simple view of human nature, something beautiful and enchanting being destroyed for the fun of simply destroying. "Roger led the way straight through the castles, kicking them over, burying the flowers, scattering the chosen stones." There is no need for this; why could Roger not go around the castles, flowers and stones? Instead he chose to devastate everything that the littleuns had been completing. What is even more frightening is the fact that he enjoyed destroying those castles; it makes him feel powerful and better than the younger children. "Maurice followed, laughing and added destruction." Maurice follows Roger's lead, showing the lack of consideration for anyone other than themselves. ...read more.

Conclusion

"Seems to me that we ought to have a chief to decide things." From the first pages; it is clear to the readers that the boys do not think of this as reality; but a game. And they are already taking the game to an extreme level. Ralph could have always said instead of chief; leader. Or captain. But chief has reasoning behind it. Without even noticing; the boys have put themselves down for a dictatorship. Chief is more primitive and indicates a level of 'doing what your told'. A leader would lead the boys; a chief would tell them what to do. A sense of pessimism of human nature is conveyed through this language; they are no longer a group of boys. But a tribe of savages and they haven't even realised. There can be nothing more negative than the Dystopia these boys have created for themselves. Golding proved his theory within his novel 'Lord of the Flies.' William Golding saw the untold terrors of World War Two; he saw what humans could do to their own kind, how we can be heartless. How the need to kill can over power us into doing something inhumane. He knows what people are capable of; and it scared him; scared him enough to write this novel. To explain to us that there will never be a Utopia, or the perfect world. Simply because human nature will never let there be. A potential for evil is inside of us; and it is merely waiting to unfold. ...read more.

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