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Pride and Prejudice Jane Austen.

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Introduction

Pride and Prejudice Jane Austen wrote six novels in all, and each of them is about courtship and marriage during the early nineteenth century. Pride and Prejudice is a comic novel; the ironic opening sentence sets the tone, outlines the plot and states the theme of social criticism: "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife." In this novel, marriage is seen as market, and the young women are its merchandise. In this novel eight people become married. I shall examine two of these relationships and will decide on whether or not the individuals are suitably paired. I have chosen to review the relationships between Mr. Collins and Charlotte Lucas and also Mr Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet. I have chosen these two in particular to show a contrast, marrying for love and marrying for material possessions items. Firstly I will discuss the Collinses' relationship. This is a relationship where each individual uses the other for personal gain. Mr Collins gets a wife and Charlotte gets an establishment. ...read more.

Middle

Mr Collins does all the talking while she just smiles and nods her head. Both husband and wife appear to be content, however, and the marriage appears to be stable and harmonious. The second marriage that I am going to discuss is that of Mr Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet. This relationship is somewhat of a roller coaster relationship, which doesn't get off on the right foot as Elizabeth overhears Mr Darcy's first impression of her as being, "tolerable but not quite handsome enough to tempt me." Elizabeth on hearing this takes a dislike to Darcy, describing him as "bitter and rude" and believing "that he fancied himself." There are similarities between these two characters as they are both capable of justified and unjustified forms of pride but as time goes by the icy relationship thaws, but this takes time to happen. Mr Darcy and his cousin Colonel Fitzwilliam come to visit their aunt Lady Catherine. In a private conversation Colonel Fitzwilliam informs Elizabeth that Mr Darcy "saved a friend (Mr Bingley) from the inconveniences of a most imprudent marriage." Fitzwilliam does not realise what the consequences may be from what he has just told Elizabeth. ...read more.

Conclusion

Lady Catherine stepped out. She came solely to warn Elizabeth to stay away from Mr Darcy as he was to be engaged to her daughter. Elizabeth was not put off by this threat. A short time later, Mr Bennet received a later from Mr Collins congratulating him on the engagement of Elizabeth and Mr Darcy even though Elizabeth was not yet aware of Mr Darcy's feelings. Mr Darcy came back with Mr Bingley to shoot at Netherfield. It was not long before he and Elizabeth found themselves alone. While talking together Mr Darcy apologised for his behaviour towards her. He then asked if her feelings had changed since he had last proposed. If they had not changed then one word "would silence him on the matter for the rest of his life." To his delight Elizabeth said that her feelings had indeed changed and, as simply as that they were engaged. From this point onwards, it was clear that if they were married, the prospects for success were high. Their relationship overcome many trials, which could have ruined any possible chance of happiness but Elizabeth brought out the best in Mr Darcy and he adored her all the more. They eventually married and lived a happy life together. Their "love" never failed. ...read more.

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