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`Romeo and Juliet` by William Shakespeare. Look again at Act 5 Scene 3 line 1-170. Explain why the scene is dramatically important.

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Introduction

Ryan Balchin December 2002 `Romeo and Juliet` by William Shakespeare Look again at Act 5 Scene 3 line 1-170. Explain why the scene is dramatically important. Consider Closely: -Where the scene is set -How the language of the characters shows their feelings -Why the audience might find the scene interesting -How the scene is part of the tragedy of the play. `Romeo and Juliet` is one of Shakespeare's most famous tragic plays. It is about two star-crossed lovers, caught up in their opposing family feud, which ends in tragedy. Act 5 Scene 3 is the tragic climax to the play as the two lovers die with confusion on the happenings. The scene is dramatically important, as the audience will find the setting, language and characteristics very interesting, as this essay will show. This scene is set in a graveyard where Paris and The Page are there to lay flowers and say prayers for Juliet. Paris refers to the "Hollow Ground" meaning the graves that surround him, and "Under Yond Yew Trees". Yew berries have a deadly poison to their juices and this associated adds to the theme of death. The fact that Paris shouldn't be there adds tension, and it is in the middle of the night. ...read more.

Middle

They are surround by the poisonous yew berries. The Friar wants Balthazar to accompany him into the vault but he is worried as Romeo is in there. The Friar sees blood on the floor and realises there has been a recent death. The Friar enters the vault and find Romeo and Paris both dead, he now knows he is too late. He comments on "Eyeless Skulls" and he is probably a bit scared to continue on in and starts to have second thoughts. Juliet awakes and sees Romeo lying there on the floor dead and wants to stay with him but The Friar urges her to leave the vault as he hears people approaching. Juliet overcomes the surroundings and decides to stay with Romeo and this is where the second part of the tragedy occurs. The language in this scene differs from character to character, as they express their feelings. First Paris enters the scene. The language he uses is very formal. He speaks in rhyme that is part of a sonnet (14 line Poem) "O woe, thy canopy is dust and stones- Which with sweet water nightly I will dew Or, wanting that, with tears distilled by moans The obsequies that I for thee will keep, Nightly shall be to strew thy grave and weep" This contrasts with Romeo, he talks about his feeling, from the heart, about Juliet. ...read more.

Conclusion

Shakespeare's tragedies are not pessimistic, hopeless plays. The audience does not feel that the deaths that end the plays have been pointless. Certainly, they are regretted; certainly we wish things could be different; but we do not despair. This is the peculiarly agonised response a Shakespearean tragedy always evokes. We have just seen how `Romeo and Juliet` vindicates the lovers and that their deaths bring about reconciliation and peace. We are, at once, glad they did not die in vain, and sad they had to die at all. The two things go hand in hand: it is because Romeo and Juliet are the lovers they are that we wish they could live, and yet it is precisely because they are the lovers they are that they have to die. We can put it in another way: were they not such lovers they would have lived; but the feud would have continued too. This is the central irony of Shakespearean tragedy: we, in the audience, suffer because we so much want a happy ending even as we know that it is impossible, that in a strange way, it is better that the protagonists die. In this scene it is the characters and the language they use to express their feelings about each other that makes the scene dramatically important ...read more.

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