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Shakespeare wrote 'Julius Caesar' in such a way that it is difficult to say whether Caesar had tyrannical instincts or not.

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Introduction

Shakespeare wrote 'Julius Caesar' in such a way that it is difficult to say whether Caesar had tyrannical instincts or not. Weigh the evidence provided in the play and give your considered opinion on this matter. Throughout Shakespeare's play Caesar demonstrates both tyrannical and non tyrannical instincts in such a way that it is difficult to reach a decision on whether Caesar wanted control of Rome or not. This made Brutus' choice to kill him hard to justify. In scene one Caesar gives both reason for being power hungry but also for not wanting the crown. In this scene Caesar is offered the crown three times by Mark Anthony. Each time he denied the crown more willingly. This suggests that he actually did want the crown to be laid upon his head. This can be supported in the way that Caesar and the crowd reacted. The crowd were very pleased that he denied the crown. This annoyed Caesar, possibly because he wanted the crown, and caused him to faint. In this way he displayed tyrannical instincts. On the other hand this scene could be viewed in an entirely different way. The fact that Caesar denied the crown three times albeit each time more unwillingly could be interpreted as Caesar not wanting power. ...read more.

Middle

In saying this Caesar is indicating that whatever circumstances that will affect him shall be dealt with last. This means that he is not worrying for himself but for what may be concern for others. In other words it seems as if Caesar is concerned with the fate of Rome, not himself. This behaviour is not typical of a tyrant and consequently gives evidence that Caesar did not have tyrannical instincts. Furthermore the speeches of other characters also provide evidence for Caesar having tyrannical instincts. Words from Cassius in act 1 scene 2 also help give evidence that Caesar looks upon himself as better than the people of Rome. ' Like a Collosus; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves' With this Cassius is saying how Caesar has become like collosus which was a huge statue and how the insignificant men wander beneath his legs searching for dishonourable graves. This means that he sees himself as better than ordinary men. In argument to this it can be said that when Cassius said this he was trying to persuade Brutus to help himself and the conspirators kill Caesar. On top of this Cassius also showed signs of jealousy towards Caesar. ...read more.

Conclusion

This can be viewed as strange as it wouldn't be the normal behaviour of a tyrant. However, it could also be argued that it wouldn't of mattered to Caesar what was in his will. By giving away money and his gardens doesn't mean that he wasn't a tyrant because it wouldn't of affected him as he would've been dead. The content of the will would have no affected on Caesar's hold on Rome. It is possible that the will could have been a way to enhance his image and popularity after his death. It can be seen that throughout much of the first half of the play Caesar himself and other characters give evidence of how he shows tyrannical and non tyrannical instincts. Despite the fact that Caesar does display non tyrannical instincts I think that the evidence for him being tyrannical far outweighs the evidence against. I think that the scene where Caesar denies the crown three times and then faints is one of the best examples of how he wanted the crown. The way in which he was constantly building himself up as a better person than everyone else also shows me his tyrannical instincts. Consequently I think they Brutus' decision was right and that Caesar had tyrannical instincts which demonstrated in the play. ...read more.

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