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'Sometimes it is a single event which propels a child from innocence into adulthood. Discuss.

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Introduction

'Sometimes It Is A Single Event Which Propels A Child From Innocence Into Adulthood. Discuss, With Reference To The Texts You Have Read Throughout The Course.' (Jane Eyre + Red Room) Everyone has to grow up at some stage in their life, and in the three texts I have studied; the young children have been almost thrown into adulthood. This is because they have experienced an emotionally painful event, which forces them to come face to face with the harsh and cruel realities of adult life. In each of the pieces of writing, the children are all the young age of ten when they go through the horrific incident that forces them to mature. In 'Jane Eyre', Jane is locked in the Red Room when she is only ten years old. `for I was but ten;` In 'The Lesson' the boy hears of his father's death when he was `a month past ten` In 'The Flowers', Myop is only ten when she discovers the body of the deceased black man `She was ten, ` Each of the writers makes the children in their texts such a vulnerable age to increase the impact of the tragedy they have to go through. It makes the reader feel sympathetic for the child and conveys how painful the experience must be. In each of the texts, the children featured all come from varied backgrounds, and have all been treated in different ways before being forced from childhood. Some have had happier childhoods than others. In 'Jane Eyre', Jane is an orphan whose parents were killed by TB? She is left in the care of her uncle, but he too passes away. Jane is then left to be looked after by her aunt, Mrs. Reed. Mrs. ...read more.

Middle

She finds herself in a 'gloomy little cove' and pathetic fallacy signals that something bad is about to happen, as 'the silence becomes close and deep' The change in atmosphere as Myop ventures further into the unknown symbolises how the happy and sunny mood of childhood is a very different feeling to the more mature, serious feel of adulthood. Myop feels uncertain about these unfamiliar surroundings and begins to turn back to the 'peacefulness of the morning' conveying how she prefers the comfort of home and childhood. In 'Jane Eyre', the atmosphere in the Red Room is extremely powerful, and the terrifying atmosphere results in Jane imagining the ghost of her uncle appearing before her. Jane is overwhelmed by the huge size of everything in the Red Room. In particular the furniture and large windows emphasise the smallness of Jane. 'A bed supported on massive pillars of mahogany.' Bronte's use of the word 'massive' conveys the vastness of the bed and how it towers over the small girl, making her feel overpowered and helpless. There is a cold, hostile atmosphere in the room, due to the fact the room is hardly visited, except to be cleaned. 'it is known to be seldom entered' Jane feels uncertain about the room and it seems unfriendly and even more frightening because it seems to be a place where no one dare enter. The room seems to have a 'chill' because Jane's uncle, Mr. Reed dies in the room. It was also the Red Room where he 'lay in state' until he was buried. This would make the room feel eerie, ' a sense of dreary consecration' conveys how it was almost tomblike, especially to a girl of Jane's age. ...read more.

Conclusion

She would probably be worried that the colour of her skin would affect her life in years to come when she is older. All three of the children featured in the texts are forced to experience painful emotions as they are thrown into adulthood. This increases the impact the event has for the reader, making the text more emotive and interesting. Metaphors feature in each of the texts. In 'Jane Eyre', the Red Room is described as a 'jail' by Bronte. This conveys the way there is no escape for Jane, and how she is trapped in the Room. In 'The Lesson', Lucie-Smith uses the goldfish in the assembly hall to convey the still and silent atmosphere, and uses a metaphor to show how the young boy is trapped by the bully, when he says the goldfish ' ...sculled Around their shining prison on its shelf.' The fish are trapped just as the young boy is. A metaphor is used in 'The Flowers' to convey how Myop's childhood has come to an end. When Myop first steps on the skull, she carries on collecting flowers. She then spots a lone 'wild pink rose' which symbolises Myop herself and he vibrant, carefree nature. As she looks more closely, she sees 'a ring, around he rose's root'. It is the noose, which strangled the black man. The noose around the isolated flower symbolises racism against black people. It creates the image that racism is strangling Myop's youth, and forcing her to mature and learn about complex and disturbing issues like racial discrimination. As Myop realises how the man has been lynched because of his skin colour, she 'laid down her flowers. And the summer was over' This symbolises how her happy carefree life as a child is now at an end, and she is thrown into adulthood. ...read more.

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