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The Events in Brutus’s tent (act 4 scenes 2 and 3)

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Introduction

Danni The Events in Brutus's tent (act 4 scenes 2 and 3) have been considered to be the most exciting and engaging episode of the tradgedy play Julius Caesar. This is because the scene is an emotional roller coaster; it starts with an argument between Brutus and Cassius, which slowly builds, to a climax and finally the two reconcile. Then the drama builds again through the announcement of Portia's death and the arrival and departure of Caesar's ghost. The variety of events keeps the audience on the edge of their seats one minute and crying with emotion for Brutus the next. However Despite the tension and high drama in this scene I think that Act 2 Scene 1 is more engaging because of the supernatural goings on and the spooky appearance of the conspirators. Also the quick succession of events (Brutus's soliloquy, the conspirators entry, Portia's suspicions) There are a lot of powerful arguments in this scene with powerful and emotive language in them between the conspirators and between Portia and Brutus also Brutus's argument with himself in his soliloquy. The soliloquy is extremely moving for the audience because they are given an insight into Brutus's mind. Act 2 scene 1 is very well structured to ensure that the audience is never bored. The beginning of act 4 scene 2 is very thrilling, the scene has changed from Rome this will get the audience's attention. There are drumbeats in the background that build up pressure. In the previous scene Anthony was preparing for war which was quite tense for the audience and then a quick change of scene with a dramatic start will have been very exciting for the audience. Brutus is the first character to speak, 'stand ho!' this is a direct order and immediately gets the audience to focus on what is about to happen with the characters, this is very engaging. Brutus tells us that he is displeased with Cassius and that he shall find out what is going on. ...read more.

Middle

Brutus and Cassius have another difference of opinion about what to do about the battle. Brutus puts forward some very good points, yet Cassius is not convinced. Brutus has always had more power than Cassius even with the conspirators. Brutus joined them last and although Cassius only involved Brutus so that he could get closer to Caesar and so that other men would follow Brutus but Brutus ended up controlling the plans more than Cassius did. This difference between Brutus and Cassius will be engaging for the audience because it makes them feel like they know the characters if similar patterns in relationships between them are shown in various parts of the story. Such as the conspirators planning although Cassius is, in theory, the ringleader of the conspirators as soon as they start to plan Brutus becomes the most powerful of the two and ends up making most decisions and overruling Cassius's opinions. After the murder of Caesar Cassius does not want Mark Anthony to speak at the pulpit but Brutus trust Mark Anthony and again makes the final decision over Cassius and allows Mark Anthony to speak. This is also slightly ironic as that decision brought about the downfall of Brutus and Cassius. When the ghost of Caeser enters it is highly breathtaking. In Shakespeare's time people believed that spirits beyond human control governed the world. The ghost of Caesar is a force and it could represent Brutus's guilt. Brutus felt extremely bad about killing someone that he loved and respected but felt it was for the good of Rome. Now that Rome is worse after Caesar's death Brutus must be feeling terrible and he might be realizing that what he did was wrong, the spirit even tells Brutus that he is evil, ""thy evil spirit Brutus". This part of the play will be very important for the audience in Elizabethan times because of their beliefs in the spirit world. ...read more.

Conclusion

The clock striking three is startling and also reminds everyone how spooky it is that all this plotting is going on at this time. Now that the audience knows the plot it is suspenseful because they will want to know how it turns out. When Portia enters it is striking because we know something that the character doesn't. Also we see another side of Brutus, while he is trying to hide the conspiracy, he doesn't like upsetting her he flatters her. "Good Portia go to bed" He acts worried about her, "It is not for your health thus to commit Your weak condition to the raw cold morning." There is a romantic moment in all this which will help the audiences sympathy for Brutus and possibly restore the opinion that he is a good man in those that thought his decision to join the conspiracy was wrong, "You are my true and honorable wife, As dear to me as are the ruddy drops That visit my sad heart" This show of love is a theme all through the play this is shown through love between husband and wife (Brutus and Portia, Caesar and Calphurnia) also love for a country (Rome). Eventually he agrees to tell her what is going on later. All this is different to the strong and valiant conspirator Brutus, here we see him as a loving husband. In Conclusion, Shakespeare's use of language and structure is very effectively dramatic and manages to gradually build up tension and then release it a little. This ensures that the audience is never given a chance to get bored. The use of dramatic irony, the supernatural and indecision in the characters all combine to keep the audience on the edge of their seats throughout both these scenes. Both scenes are very powerful and effectively dramatic but despite the emotional roller coaster in Act 4 scenes 2 and 3, in my opinion Act 2 scene 1 was more dramatic and engaging for the audience because of the atmosphere that is created by the setting and outside influences. ...read more.

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