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The Theme of the Pain of Love in Far From the Madding Crowd.

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Introduction

The Theme of the Pain of Love in Far From the Madding Crowd Hardy was born in Dorset and was an architect at first. He then wrote many fiction books - Far From the Madding Crowd being his fourth - and also wrote a lot of poetry. Far From the Madding Crowd has everything a good novel needs: love and death, happiness and sadness, loyalty and betrayal. It is a simple book containing simple people going about their simple, everyday lives. The notion of love in Far From the Madding Crowd is very strong and every chapter is concerned with Bathsheba, Oak, Troy, Fanny and Boldwood, in their nasty, twisted web of love. This essay focuses on two of these slightly unorthodox relationships: Bathsheba and Troy, and Bathsheba and Boldwood. Troy, who was initially going to marry Fanny, meets Bathsheba purely by accident. While walking around the farm, Bathsheba gets her dress caught in Troy's spur. Troy believes that she is a man. We know this because he says, "Have I hurt you mate?" This shows he is quick at deciding things and makes snap judgements, which is shown previously, when he abandons Fanny without giving her a chance to explain her lateness, believing that she didn't turn up on purpose. ...read more.

Middle

Readers are left feeling very sorry for her, and, although life gets better after this incident, she is never the same as the scene has been imprinted onto her mind, never to be removed. Boldwood is another man who was obsessed with Bathsheba and her beauty. He wants to meet her but she refuses, her vanity not allowing herself to be seen in a dirty state - "I can't see him in this state. Whatever shall I do?" When Boldwood shows that he is not subtle in showing feelings and begins over-complimenting Miss Everdene at the sheep washing and telling her how he wants to tell her that he wants to tell her he loves her over and over again. We see instantly how smitten he his with Bathsheba and perhaps see already that he will do whatever he can to marry her. Bathsheba is upset when Boldwood ignores her in church. Although she says to Liddy, who points out that he never once looked at her, "Why should he, I never asked him to." This is her way of covering up the fact that she is really upset. She is intending to send a Valentines Day card to Teddy Coggan, but after tossing the bible she decides to send it to Boldwood instead. ...read more.

Conclusion

No one probably stops him because it is such a sudden shock. This shows how insane Boldwood has become. In this novel, Hardy details often on the pain of love, and demonstrates to everyone the fact that love is not simple, and is a complex rollercoaster of emotions and there is more often than not more than two people involved. The two men are very different, but similar in some ways. Both are, obviously, bowled over by Bathsheba's beauty and they are both highly respected gentlemen. They both display their emotions in very different ways however. Sergeant Troy can keep his feelings well under wrap, not really letting on to many people how he truly feels. Boldwood however, cannot contain his emotions as well as Troy, so therefore, goes insane because of his love, or even lust, of Bathsheba, which appears much stronger than Troy's, who really prefers Fanny. Bathsheba is more inclined to be with Troy because he is a young, dashing solider. She gives Boldwood the cold shoulder because he is an ageing, boring farmer, who cannot add the spice to life that she requires. By Michael J. Ritchie Michael Ritchie - 1 - Ms Farrell - English Far From The Madding Crowd Coursework ...read more.

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