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'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell and 'Our Love Now' by Martyn Lowery both see men trying to use methods of persuasion t

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Introduction

'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell and 'Our Love Now' by Martyn Lowery both see men trying to use methods of persuasion to get what they want. How successful are they? I have recently studied 'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell, written in the 17th Century and 'Our Love Now' by Martyn Lowery, written in the 19th century. Attitudes to love have changed a lot since the 17th Century. When 'To His Coy Mistress' was written, men were in charge of the relationship. It would take a lot longer for this relationship to progress than it would today. The man would court the woman for months before anything progressed. He would write her letters and poems, and then eventually, if he loved her, he would ask her to marry him. They would not make love until they were married, as sex outside of marriage was frowned upon. However, today a relationship before marriage can be any length of time and there is no one in charge of it as men and women are more equal in today's society. 'To His Coy Mistress' is a poem about a man trying to persuade a shy woman to have sex with him. In the first section he romances her, convinces her that he respects her, tells her she is beautiful and how he adores her. ...read more.

Middle

In the third section he uses excitement to convince her. He speeds up the poem by using simpler language so the reader can say it faster. He also uses words with a sense of urgency such as :.. Times winged chariot hurrying near". He tells her to grab life and live it to the full, not to waste it "...Rather at once our time devour ... " He excites her and tells her to have fun; "...Now let us sport us while we may...", " Thus, through we cannot make our sun/ Stand still, yet we will make him run." end the poem, leaving it open yet telling her to make the most of time while we are here. He also uses repetition, for example the word "love" is repeated four times, He uses the word as the main point of his feelings and that by them having sex is because of love not lust. Nevertheless, this poem does not show what the woman thinks. The ending is left open for our imagination. But I think the woman will now agree. He has given her no room to think about or doubt their love. He has not said anything about why she might not want to make love but just gives reasons why they should. He has made her feel that she is really loved by him and that he really respects her. ...read more.

Conclusion

affiliation and this is final, but deep down he already knows his lover has made her mind up because her response is clear and straight. He does not use or relate to the 'happy' times they must have had, so I think he has already tried that method, but it had not worked. I think 'To His Coy Mistress' presents the most influential argument. Although we don't hear the woman's response, I think she fell for his persuasions. He gave a very strong, consistent argument, allowing no time for the woman to sort out in her own head, her feelings for him. The way the argument is constructed implies he is forcing her to have sexual relations. He does not give her a choice, but uses his power over her to get his own way. I think he almost bullies her into making love to him as he never stops bombarding her with his opinions. In 'To His Coy Mistress' the poet uses a variety of methods. The way the poem is constructed makes it sound as if it is written flippantly, but the reader can see through him. I don't think the woman would see this as it is covered by clever examples. However, after studying the poem you can see this. He makes her feel secure, makes her think he loves her and tells her what he wants yet does not put it so bluntly that in undermines his otherwise very successful persuasions. ...read more.

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