• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why is Act 3 Scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet such an important scene in the play and how does Shakespeare make it dramatic and exciting?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Why is Act 3 Scene 1 of "Romeo and Juliet" such an important scene in the play and how does Shakespeare make it dramatic and exciting? Shakespeare's tragedy Romeo and Juliet is a tale of the 'star-crossed lovers' who take their lives for each other when their love is suppressed by their feuding parents. The audience already know exactly what is going to happen in the play as they have heard the prologue which tells the story in advance, adds pathos to the play and allows the audience to have an overview of the play. The previous scene is in complete contrast to Act 3 Scene 1 because Shakespeare creates a scene of love and romance, then follows with a scene of violence and hatred. By the end of the previous scene, Romeo and Juliet have fallen in love and secretly married. Friar Laurence married Romeo and Juliet and the Nurse is like a mother figure to Juliet so she also knows about the wedding. Shakespeare effectively uses dramatic irony to create mood and atmosphere in this scene because the audience are aware of the marriage whilst the rest of the characters are unaware with the exceptions of: Friar Laurence; Romeo; Juliet and the Nurse. ...read more.

Middle

The dramatic irony of this is that Tybalt sent Romeo a letter challenging him to a duel but Romeo did not receive the letter as he was in bed with Juliet at the time. The mood at this point in the play is very intense as the language that Tybalt uses is quite aggressive. Although Romeo tries his very best to avoid any trouble, Mercutio cannot resist and so draws his sword whilst shouting: "Alla stoccata carries it away. Tybalt, you rat-catcher, will you walk?" Here Mercutio is showing his love for Romeo and his hate for Tybalt as he is offering to fight instead of Romeo. Mercutio makes another clever play on words and provokes Tybalt again when he calls him "Good King of Cats" and a "rat-catcher", to say someone is the King of Cats could be a compliment meaning that they are agile and swift with a sword but it could also be an insult meaning that they are sly like a cat. This could also be taken as an insult because it could be referring to an old story medieval story about a cat called Tibalt. When Mercutio is stabbed by Tybalt under Romeo's arm, he shouts, "A plague a' both your houses!" ...read more.

Conclusion

At the end of Act 3 Scene 1, the Prince is telling the people of Verona about Romeo's punishment and says, "Immediately we do exile him in hence". Being exiled is worse for Romeo than death and so when the audience hear the word "exile"; they are gain interest and become majorly involved in the scene. In conclusion, Act 3 Scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet is such a dramatic, exciting and important scene in the play because Shakespeare uses many different and effective methods such as dramatic irony, pathetic fallacy, contrast between different scenes, prose, play on words, and of course death. All of these methods contribute to make the scene more dramatic and exciting along with the variety of language and exhilarating plot which also help to interest and involve the audience more. The consequences of the killings in Act 3 Scene 1 are simply that they lead to more deaths in the play and finally the deaths of the son of the Montague's and the daughter of the Capulet's. Act 3 Scene 1 is the key turning point in the play as it contains the event which twists the play from romance to tragedy. Everything in the play builds up to this scene and this is where the plot reaches a climax. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Romeo and Juliet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Romeo and Juliet essays

  1. I will be exploring and analysing the different ways and methods in which Shakespeare ...

    Stunned at what his wife had just mentioned to him Capulet replies, "Soft! Take me with you, take me with you wife. How I will she none? Doth she not give us thans?" Capulet is so astonished at what he has heard that he needs his wife to repeat it to him again.

  2. How does Shakespeare use language, structure and dramatic devices in Act 3 Scene 1 ...

    He even blames Juliet for him not fighting, "O sweet Juliet, Thy beauty hath made me effeminate, And in my temper softened valour's steel". His love for Juliet stopped him fighting Tybalt as they were family, but his love for Juliet also resulted in the death of Mercutio.

  1. How does Shakespeare make Act 3 Scene 1 of Romeo and Juliet dramatic? ...

    Villain am I none; Therefore farewell, I see thou knowest me not. When Romeo says this line, it clearly states that he is not up for a fight with Tybalt as he was now family. But neither Tybalt nor Mercutio knew this. This irony links back with the word 'consortest'.

  2. Explain How Shakespeare Creates Dramatic Tension in III.v

    These quotations show Capulet to have a split personality; as he doesn't know what to think of Juliet. This may be because he does not know her as many 1st class fathers had very little association and relationships with their children.

  1. Acts 3 scene 1 of the play is a turning point. How important are ...

    The punishment Romeo now is expecting is banishment. The punishment the prince decides on is banishment, quote: 'Let Romeo hence in haste, else when he is found, that hour is his last', the prince decides on banishment. The prince comes to this conclusion because both sides have lost someone, quote: 'my blood for your rude brawls doth lie a-bleeding.

  2. How does Shakespeare use dramatic devices in Act 3 Scene 1 of Romeo and ...

    This scene is being laid upon on a public place on a hot summer's day. This scene is very significant as it involves a brawl between the Capulets and Montagues which is very dramatic as it changes the whole story of the play from that point.

  1. In what way is Act 3 Scene 1 a turning point in the play ...

    then 'Tybalt under Romeo's arm thrusts Mercutio in'. The death of Mercutio changes Romeo and his anger becomes aroused. He pursues Tybalt in defence of Mercutio's honour and in revenge for his death. He feels that he is controlled by fate, 'I am fortune's fool', which links with 'A pair of starcross'd lovers' in the prologue.

  2. In what way is Act 3 Scene 1 a turning point in the play ...

    He is not a typical Montague, he sees fighting as pointless. He accidentally causes Mercutio's death ironically by trying to separate him from Tybalt. The stage directions tell us: 'Romeo steps between them' Romeo says, 'Hold, Tybalt! Good Mercutio!' then 'Tybalt under Romeo's arm thrusts Mercutio in'.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work