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With Reference to two night scenes Compare and Contrast Hardy's Presentation and consider his use of Time and Place.

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With Reference to two night scenes Compare and Contrast Hardy's Presentation and consider his use of Time and Place The fact that Hardy uses night scenes frequently suggests that he uses them to give a particular dimension to his writing. Clearly night scenes take place in the dark, which leads to the characters being unfamiliar both with other characters and with the surroundings. This unfamiliarity gives us a sense of foreboding, which helps to make the scenes atmospheric. All of the scenes which take place at night have a dramatic nature, either because the characters are physically endangered, as is the case with the Fire scene, or emotionally endangered for example outside the Barracks. The combination of a dark atmosphere and dramatic action leads to conflict and tension within the scenes. The fire scene takes place when Gabriel Oak has just arrived in the village of Wetherbury- inside one of the barns on Batheba Everdene's farm. It is passed dusk, and Gabriel notes that "the landscape had assumed a uniform hue of blackness." Hardy uses onomatopoeias such as "whisking noise" "quiet roar" and "crackle" which gives the reader an audible as well as a visual image of the scene that is taking place. ...read more.


This is starkly contrasted with the phrases "flames darted" and "flames elongated and bent themselves" which suggest the quick licking movement of the flames- a link to the "tongues hanging from lips". He also uses strong colours, for instance "rich orange glow" and "lustrous yellow uniformity" which both link directly to the scene in the first chapter where Oak sees Bathsheba for the first time on top of the travelling wagon, and the sun "lighted up to a scarlet glow" and there was a "soft lustre" upon her face. The second scene, which involves the meeting of two new characters, Fanny Robins and Sergeant Troy takes place outside an Army Barracks in the town of Casterbridge. We are told that the time is Ten o'clock at night due to the "dull blow" of church bells. As with the fire scene Hardy uses onomatopoeias, however in this scene he contrasts soft sounds, "fluffy" and "muffling" with harder sounds "smacked" and "gurgle and cluck" which mirrors the effect of soft snow falling onto the hard landscape. Sound is important in the scene as there is little to visualise and because the effect of the snow changes and distorts ordinary sounds. ...read more.


For Fanny it is the same as the old proverb "like talking to a brick wall." Both the scenes are similar in the fact that they take place at night, in darkness, and that they involve the meeting (or possibly re-uniting) of two characters in an unusual circumstance. However they are totally different in all other aspects- and one of the reasons I chose to compare them is that they are at the opposite extremes of temperature- burning and freezing- both of which reflect the emotions or the personalities of the characters involved in them. The fire scene, which takes place at Bathsheba's farm mimics her temperament in that she is a fiery and passionate woman, she radiates warmth and exudes vivacity and vitality. In juxtaposition to this the scene which takes place at the army Barracks, amid the snow, and the frozen river mirrors the emotional response of Sergeant Troy in that he is cold and unfeeling towards his lover Fanny, and he is numb to her pleas and begging. The darkness and bitter weather reflect their relationship because he is distant towards her and isolates her from his true feelings. ...read more.

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