• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Strategies to support children and their families

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Task 2 P5 Strategies to support children and their families When problems occur at home, parents and the children need support. The Children Act 1989 states that, children and families are not automatically separated when things go wrong. The children should be kept within the family, if possible. Different forms of help may be needed in the family home but does not necessarily mean, that the family has to split up, because of this. Where children have been separated from the family home, every effort is made to accommodate the child with extended family or friends. A place in a residential home or foster care, is the last resort if there are no alternatives for the child. Families who are involved in abusive situations, cannot be helped by just one agency, i.e. social services. There will be a range of professionals who would be involved, to give their experience and expertise, to be able to work with the family and be there to support them. Under the Children Act, the social services have a duty to provide services for children and families in need. These needs are:- * Children, who are not achieving a reasonable standard of health or development. ...read more.

Middle

These professionals can support the families in their own home, the family may find that entering outside the home, can be frightening, they may feel intimidated. There are organisations which can offer services to families who are in need. Sure start This is an anti-poverty strategy, child poverty and social exclusion. It also aims to improve the social and emotional development and the well-being of families and children before and after birth, so they are ready to thrive, when the children go to school. Neighbourhood nurseries This is childcare and early education learning places, in disadvantaged areas to reduce employment. Family centres These are funded by social services and health departments. They offer a wide range of provision to support the families and children by giving them education, parenting skills, provision for pre-school children, after school care, support and group therapy, to improve relationships between the family play therapists and psychologists. Counsellors Providing one-to-one support for child or parent. Guardian Appoints the child's interest when they go to court. There also voluntary organisations to support families in need. These are:- NSPCC, Barnardos, NCH, these organisations have the power to remove children who are at risk of harm from their homes. ...read more.

Conclusion

Children who have been abandoned, or been left in the house, or children who may have been in trouble with the law, children who have been abused, or even a child who has a long term problem and the birth parents can not handle the situation, may go into foster care. Foster parents are registered with the local authority. They have training in child care, to help the children who they look after. They get paid for the work that they do, to offset the cost of caring for the child. Private sector - this is when employers are employed privately by a specific firm for one of the above. The Early Years Practitioner - will be there to support the child. By effective listening and communication. By being consistent and honest to the child. The child needs to be able to rely and trust you. Reassuring the child at all times, reassuring them that its not their fault. Consulting other professionals and informing the child what you are doing at all times. Giving the child activities, that enable them to express their feelings, if they are sad, happy. Giving them praise and positive reinforcement at all times, to improve their self-image, self esteem. E.g. body image activities, to draw themselves, with the use of mirrors e.t.c. giving them responsibilities and tasks for them to do. __________________________________________ ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Child Development section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Child Development essays

  1. Health and Social care

    They also need the professional advice to be able to make the right decisions about their own health. Without this help from a doctor, the patient is likely to make the wrong choices, which can ultimately damage the patient's health.

  2. CHILDRENS DIETRY REQUIREMENTS

    Religious and cultural beliefs. In a setting you would respect and encourage all religious and cultural beliefs, prepare the dietary needs to enhance this. Muslims. Eat Hulal meat which means it has been slaughtered and prepared in a certain way. We had a child on the hulal diet at Willingtots.

  1. Types of children's behaviour and strategies to deal with these

    His behaviour distracted the other children in the class but they were told to ignore him when he was like this. Obviously though this was not always possible, especially when he made animal noises or started rocking back and forth.

  2. Prisoners' families have been referred to as the forgotten victims of crime. Why ...

    The prison service is piloting and encouraging new schemes involving increased visitation rights for prisoners and families. An aspect of this is improved home leave and visiting arrangements between both parties. Such schemes have the potential to allow for an intimate yet relaxed environment for the family.

  1. Why family structures are changing.

    praise and recognition and the need for responsibility" ref an introduction to childcare and education, Carolyn meggitt, Jessica Stevens and Tina Bruce. At this age John has social needs that he needs to interact with his parents and his siblings this is his way of socialising, as his parents talk

  2. THE TRUTH ON AUTHORITATIVE PARENTING STLYE

    misbehavior in training parents to manage their disruptive children more effectively (Patterson, 1982). They generally regard reasoning as an ineffective discipline tactic (e.g., Blum, Williams, Friman & Christopherson, 1995), except for descriptions of the contingencies of punishment and reinforcement. A few experts have bridged the conceptual gap, most notably Diana Baumrind in her work on parenting styles.

  1. Family Support Resource

    and so far as it is consistent with that aim, to promote their up-bringing by their families. (CA 1989) Assessment and Planning I was to assist the family with parenting skills and to work directly with the young person to address any challenging behaviour he was demonstrating.

  2. Working with Children - settings, legislation and values.

    but ensure you are fully aware of what is happening to avoid the co-operation breaking and misunderstanding the situation completely. Consistency Consistency is important so that all team members are taking the same approach to the task of caring for the children and working with the families Encouragement Encouragement is

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work