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Chamberlain's policy towards Germany - source related questions and answers

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Introduction

1. Study Source A What can you learn from Source A about Chamberlain's policy towards Germany? From Source A, we learn that Chamberlain was evidently in "no position" and not ready to go to war with Germany. Chamberlain describes Germany as "a formidable power", which suggests Chamberlain's view of Germany's strength and how strongly he was against the idea of another war. Also from source A, we learn that Germany may also have been "aided by Italian attacks on our Mediterranean possessions and communications", which Chamberlain thought of as an even bigger threat on Britain's empire if Hitler was united with Italy. This was another reason why Chamberlain's policy was needed. Germany also seemed to know that France's army was strong but also was "desperately weak in some vital spots". Chamberlain knew that this meant if there was another war, not only would the British army fail but the French army would also not be able to withstand Germany's power. Therefore, Chamberlain decided to "adjust" the means of foreign policy in his favour so he could buy himself enough time until Britain's rearmaments, among other countries i.e. France, were "strong". 2. Study Sources A and B Does Source B support the evidence of Source A about Chamberlain's foreign policy? Explain your answer. ...read more.

Middle

Both sources were written before the Munich Conference and invasion of Czechoslovakia. These sources show the first impressions Chamberlain gained of Hitler. Source C shows how Chamberlain thought he was incapable of starting a war and source D shows that Chamberlain thought Hitler was an honest and good man who was true to his word. Both of these first impressions were wrong and Chamberlain was fooled when Hitler took over Western Czechoslovakia. This changed Chamberlain's opinion of Hitler considerably. 4. Study Sources E, F and G How useful are these sources in helping you to understand Hitler's demands in September 1938? Sources E, F and G are all official documents. This suggests that the sources are extremely reliable because it gives the Czechoslovak government and the British government's true points of view. Both governments would not lie on such a serious matter and lie through very important, official statements and therefore are reliable. Source E describes Hitler's demand for "areas of Czechoslovakia with probably 50% German population", which he want to become part of the Reich (the German Empire). This meant he would gain vital areas to Czechoslovakia's wealth and industry, which was the main reason for this demand. ...read more.

Conclusion

At the Munich Conference, Chamberlain gave away the Sudetenland without the consultation of the Czechs. Czechoslovakia was not invited to the meeting because Chamberlain knew they would oppose to the handing over of the Sudetenland region. This action did not please the Czechs and showed Chamberlain to be very cowardly and not courageous in the way he handled the situation at Munich. Source E explains "The British and French governments recognise how great is the sacrifice that is required of the Czechoslovakia government" which shows they should have helped the Czechs if they supported this, but they felt they couldn't help in "the cause of peace". Chamberlain may have been seen as a coward at this time but if he stood up to Hitler, the Rhineland may have not been captured. In conclusion, I agree with the writer of Source H and I think that war was avoided in 1938 because of Chamberlain's foreign policy. This year of peace allowed Britain to become stronger and would not have survived if they went to war with Germany over the Sudetenland. Chamberlain knew that if they went to war when Germany invaded Czechoslovakia six months after the Munich Conference, they would have lost the Battle of Britain and become part of the Reich. Appeasement Coursework 01/05/2007 Kunal Khanna 11WN ...read more.

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