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Deterioration of Prison Conditions

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Introduction

Why were conditions in prisons improved during the Nineteenth Century? In the Eighteenth Century, prison conditions were abysmal at best. Thus, in the nineteenth century, it was time for change and reformation. Reform activists, such as John Howard divulged the horror of prison conditions in his book "State of the Prisons in England and Wales". The first point of address was the sanitation conditions in prisons. Conditions were horrendous and diseases ran rife. The prisons were unclean and unhygienic, squalid water. Coupled with the absence of doctors, people were laid to waste, without recourse. In the nineteenth century on doctors were introduced, as well as hygienic conditions and food. ...read more.

Middle

A lack of warders forced conditions such that offenders were mixed. This offered the possibility of rape or acted as schools for crime for young offenders. Reformists such as Elizabeth Fry ensured that the mixing was abolished and thus crime could not accumulate between generations. Level 4 Explains either improvements or conditions getting worse (5-6) E.g. 'Conditions in prisons got much worse. The ideas for reforming prisoners were not very pleasant for prisoners. They involved the silent and separate systems Prisoners were kept in their own cells where they worked by turning a crank handle round. The isolation sent some of them mad. ...read more.

Conclusion

ending of transportation, prisons used more, to reform prisoners, to stop prisons breeding more crime, to train prisons in useful work, to make it more of a deterrent, to introduce more order, the work of individuals like Fry and Howard. There was also a lack of supervision - therefore inmates were able to confer and let simmer their criminal psyche. A lack of warders forced conditions such that offenders were mixed. This offered the possibility of rape or acted as schools for crime for young offenders. Reformists such as Elizabeth Fry ensured that the mixing was abolished and thus crime could not accumulate between generations. ...read more.

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