• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Did the majority of Germans gain from the Nazi Government between 1933-1939?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Many Germans must have agreed with the Nazi ideas because by 1939 Hitler was the most popular leader in Europe. To gain this resounding popularity from the German public people must have been benefiting from Nazi rule, but did the majority of Germans benefit? One group of people in Germany were the working men. The working man benefited from the Nazis in a number of ways. Before the Nazis came into power there were millions of unemployed due to the depression. When Hitler came into power he fulfilled his promise to provide 'bread and work'. Hitler's work schemes and the re-introduction of conscription put millions back to work. Some workers did better than others. The rearmament industry did particularly well. Hitler replaced trade unions with the German Labour Front (DAF) which provided subsidized leisure and holiday facilities such as cruise liners and walking holidays for workers. The DAF was not all good for workers though, by banning trade unions workers lost all their rights to strike and bargain for better wages and working conditions. ...read more.

Middle

Some people avoided the Hitler youth but in 1936 it was made compulsory to join. School curriculums were changed with the emphasis on sport and history according to the Nazi view (anti-semitic, anti-communist views). Rebellion was dealt with harshly. All in all young people gained a lot from Hitler. Values were installed into them and they felt important. The rebels such as the Swing Movement and Edelweiss Pirates were outcasts and although towards the end of the 1930s their popularity grew, they were a small minority. Whether Hitler's influence on the military was good or bad is a matter of opinion. On one hand Hitler increased the size of the army and a lot more money and resources were given to them. On the other hand some officers in the military resented Hitler's interference and/or thought his plans too risky and ambitious. Politically the Nazis were devastating. Political opposition was not allowed making Germany a one party state. ...read more.

Conclusion

91 Jews were murdered and 20,000 were sent to concentration camps. Jews were forced to live in ghettos which the Nazis regularly decided to 'clean out' killing everyone. Finally Hitler came up with death camps where Jews, asocials, gypsies and political opponents were worked to death, gassed or shot. Six million out of eight million Jews were killed in cold blood in what has become known as the Holocaust. The Nazi system might have been fine if you were in the majority but as a member of the minority you would have been persecuted for 12 long years. Personally, I believe that the Nazi government between 1935 and 1939 for the majority of the German people was great help in pulling them through the depression and rebuilding Germany to its full power. I believe the majority of German people did gain from Nazi rule between 1933 and 1939. So long as they kept their heads down and were content to lose their political freedom, many Germans probably lived a better life. Hitler was largely seen as someone who delivered his promises. James Monaghan ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    Was Life Better For Germans In 1939 Than in 1933?

    4 star(s)

    Also, most workers did not mind the new Nazi rules that were placed upon them. Although workers lost the right to strike, they had much better pay and conditions. This in turn made the factory owners and rich businessmen happy.

  2. To What Extent Was Nazi Germany a Totalitarian State 1933-1939?

    bear as many children as possible for the good of the nation. A quote Robert Ley, a leader of the labour front states, "We start our work when the child is three. As soon as it begins to think, a little flag is put into its hand.

  1. The Nazi Police State

    and if a working-class family had a child, or two, they may not want more another child or two for countless reasons. Despite 250 marks rewarded for birthing a child, that was only 2 months wages and that would not balance against the cost of bringing a child up in any way.

  2. To what extent did the Nazis achieve an economic miracle in Germany between 1933-1939?

    The alternative was to produce synthetic goods and research was carried out into the feasibility of producing cheap synthetic oil and rubber. Schacht had previously opposed this move, arguing that it cost more to produce than to import. Hitler was attracted by the idea of autarky as it appealed to his patriotism.

  1. Why did the Nazi Party gain popularity in the years 1933-1939?

    This type of psychology or propaganda that the Nazi Party used was beginning to drive thousands - in particular young males, into believing there was hope for a new Germany. By concentrating on issues that Germans had close to their hearts, the Nazis succeeded.

  2. Describe how Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939

    Hitler was also a gifted orator. His speeches could always make successful appeals to the masses. Moreover, the Nazi Party, with its huge mass meetings, parades and formation of S.A. and S.S. troops were attractive to the younger generation. As a result, many middle class young men were recruited into the S.S.

  1. Describe how the Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939.

    economically since to do this they needed more resources than ordinary army squads did. Although the wide usage of concentration camps only began during the Second World War, the Nazis actually started some of the camps almost as soon as they came into power in 1933.

  2. How Were the Jews Persecuted in Germany between 1933-1939?

    Loyal Nazis ransacked libraries to remove any 'offending' books. Then in May 1935, Jews were no longer allowed to join the army as they were seen as inferior and Hitler believed they were unreliable.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work