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Evacuation Of British School Children In World War 2.

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Introduction

Evacuation Of British School Children In World War 2 Q1. These two sources show different sides of the start of the children's evacuation journey. Source B is a photograph taken in September 1939 of some evacuees walking to a station in London. The children are waving at the camera and look really happy. Source C is part of an interview with a teacher from 1988. It describes her experience of when she was evacuated with children from her school. From a first impression, source B looks as thought it is a useful, reliable source as what is shows would be what happened when children were evacuated. However, as everyone in the picture is looking at the camera it could easily have been staged. The adults in the photograph (who would have been teachers and helpers that were supervising the children) could have told the children to smile. Because of this, the photograph could have been used as propaganda. If this photograph were shown to parents it would help them with their decision to let their children go. Apart from all the children looking happy, another reason it might do this is that all the children are walking on the pavement. This would make parents think that if the children were all being kept safe here, that they would be in the place they were being sent to - it would also show that the evacuation program was very organised. However, unknown to them, the children could have been forced to walk there for the photograph. In fact, the only way this photo could not have been staged is because they are carrying gas masks and other bags. ...read more.

Middle

The father of this child would probably have been more at ease if all of his questions about the evacuation process had been answered which suggests that the government did not do very well in making information available to parents. The way in which the government chose to deal with problems like this was by using propaganda to convince parents that evacuation was the right thing to do. Source B is an example of something that could have been propaganda. It is a photograph taken in September 1939 and shows evacuees walking to a station in London. It would easily give the impression that evacuation was a success because it looks very organised. However, the children in this picture look to be with their school because of what they are wearing which could add to why it looks organised. I know from other sources such as the film "Hope and Glory" that sometimes parents took their children to the station when they were being evacuated. This shows it wasn't all completely organised and could make it seem like less of a success. All of the children look happy which is a reason to make it look successful. Another source, which would back up that the children were happy, is source D - the picture of the evacuees at bath time. Again they are all smiling and looking happy. However, both of these sources seem reliable but as they are photographs they could easily have been staged. The children could have been told to smile for the picture - and even if they weren't, the natural thing to do when someone takes a picture of you is smile. ...read more.

Conclusion

They were able to do this because they no longer had to stay at home and look after children. Women did such a good job whilst the men were at war that things changed so women would be allowed to do these jobs after the war. Not all of the evacuation experience was good though. Some of the children had been treated very badly when staying with foster parents - many had been forced to do unpaid labour. IT was also a very upsetting time for families as they were torn apart from loved ones. During the time when many children had gone home because of the "phoney war" the blitz began and a lot of the previously evacuated children died. Evacuation should probably have been stricter and children should have been made to stay with foster parents but as it could not have been predicted that Germany would wait so long before attacking this didn't seem very important. After looking at various sources and using my own knowledge, I have decided that I do agree with the statement "Evacuation was a great success". Evacuation had a lot of bad points, but the overall outcome was very positive. Hundreds of lives were saved, out of the 8 million paper coffins ordered, there were only 50,000 needed as only this amount of people died - a tiny amount compared to the death toll of the first world war. It also improved standards of life in Britain after the war. Health improved and the government took a much more positive attitude towards the country. Evacuation was also a success because the well organisation meant that the huge scale operation of transporting people around the country and finding foster parents was pulled off. ...read more.

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