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Germany In The 1920's - The Weimar Republic

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Introduction

GERMANY IN THE 1920'S- THE WEIMAR REPUBLIC Political Instability In the 1920's a series of riots were seen in Germany due to such poor conditions. These 'downtrodden masses' rose up in various political parties to try and find the answer to all their problems; [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [1] Communism Communists wanted a revolution, similar to that in Russia in 1917, and were totally against the Weimar republic. [2] Socialism Socialists wanted the Weimar republic to succeed. Mostly common workers supported this. [3] Center Party Were supporters of Weimar republic and were mainly Catholics. [4] Nationalism The Nationalists loathed the Weimar republic and supported the return of the Kaiser, and was made up of landowners. [5] Nazis Supporters of fascism, and wanted a pure nation, to abolish the treaty of Versailles, and hated the Weimar republic. From this confusion rose 2 extreme wing parties one of which were the Sparticists, lead by Rosa Luxembourg and Kurt Knecht on the far left. They did not only oppose the current government, moderate socialism, they also believed in equality between the rich and the poor. ...read more.

Middle

Recovery and international Relations After Germany's defeat, Gustav Stresemann supported the Nationalist parties, but opposed the Treaty of Versailles. As leader of the German People's party he became chancellor in 1923, shortly after the French occupation of the Rhur. He immediately abandoned the policy of passive resistance in the Rhur, and as foreign minister in successive coalitions he reoriented Germany's foreign relations. As well as re-tying the new mark with the gold standard to stabilize the currency He insisted upon reconciliation with the Allies. He signed the Locarno Treaties in 1925 and, most importantly, he initiated the admission of Germany to the League of Nations. The Dawes plan was an arrangement drawn up in 1924 to ease the burden of reparations forced upon Germany after World War I as a result of the Treaty of Versailles. An international committee, chaired by Charles Dawes put forward a plan that set more reasonable amounts of reparations and provided for foreign loans, mainly from the United States, to help Germany meet its payment schedule. The treaty of Locarno was an agreement designed to promote the security of Europe at the end of the war. ...read more.

Conclusion

As they bought into the stock market, so the prices of shares rose. As they bought more and more, prices went higher and higher, and ordinary investors were attracted to invest by the apparently effortless boom that was happening. By the middle of 1929 it was estimated that about nine million Americans (out of a population of 122 million) had capital invested in the stock market. On October 23 more than six million shares were traded at ever decreasing prices. On the following day, "Black Thursday", more than twice that number were traded. On Monday nine million shares changed hands; $14 billion had been wiped off the value of shares in less than a week. Then, on "Black Tuesday", everything fell apart; the share price of many big companies including General Electric and Woolworth collapsed. In that one day more than 16 million shares were traded and another $10 billion was wiped off share values. The wall street crash lead to the end of Germanys prosperity, loans from America stopped and a world wide depression hit Germany very hard until 1923. It was from this confusion and chaos that Adolph Hitler and the Nazi Party emerged. Kit Hobbs Page 1 10H ...read more.

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