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How did Hitler come to power?

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Introduction

Hitler's Rise To Power Question One One of the reasons that the Nazis came into power was the Munich Putsch. During this, Hitler, the leader of the Nazi Party, tried to seize power by marching into Munich expecting the police to support him in overthrowing the government. He chose the 8th November 1923 because people were fed-up with the government struggling with hyperinflation and the French occupation of the Ruhr so he was under the impression that all of Germany, including members of the Bavarian State Government, would help him. He was wrong. The police killed 16 Nazis and Hitler was sentenced to five years in prison. He utilised his trial to publicise his views and criticise the government. This worked and it got him very well known. He was released after nine months, equipped with some publicity and the knowledge that power would have to be obtained legally. He also organised his views into a book, which became very popular. It was entitled "Mein Kampf", German for "My Struggle" and was released in July 1925. Overall, the experience made him very popular and well-known. He was seen as a strong and determined leader as he could have easily given up after the failed putsch. His trial, in which he promoted his views, made use of his strong oratory skills, thus persuading people to see his side of the current situation. This event would help him not only then in the 1920s but a decade later in the 1930s when the depression hit Germany. At that time Hitler remembered the lessons that he had learnt from the putsch and decided to seek power legally. He had since reorganised the Nazi Party in preparation for another big disaster. This helped him make the most of a bad situation. People had also remembered him and his policies from the putsch because of the publicity he received from the trial. ...read more.

Middle

Hitler adopted this policy so people voted from him. With these political ideologies, Hitler pretty much appealed to everybody, so as a result many people decided to vote for his party. However, he never had enough votes to become Chancellor: at his height, in July 1932, he had 230 seats, insufficient for the majority of the control. He only got to where he was by appointment. The depression was a short-term cause because it only helped him when it was going on and not afterwards. As soon as it happened, it helped him immediately. As aforementioned, Hitler only gained power by appointment. The men who appointed him were ex-Chancellor Von Papen and President Hindenburg. Von Papen, who also had insufficient votes to be Chancellor, and Hindenburg wanted Hitler to be deputy. He refused because he wanted to be Chancellor. He got his way as the two men thought that he could be controlled. In January 1933, he became Chancellor and only two months afterwards he passed the Enabling Law. This was a short-term cause because it led to him immediately gaining power. As soon as he was appointed he was one step closer to acquiring total control (legally, of course). The Enabling Law, passed on March 23rd 1933, gave him the power to pass any law that he liked. Basically, it meant that rather than being Chancellor, he was now Fuhrer (dictator) of Germany. This was the final short-term cause and probably the most important one of them all because it was the thing that gave him total power and didn't just contribute to it like all the other causes did. Without Hitler passing it, he would just be a normal democratic leader, which is not what he wanted. It was a short-term cause because it helped him instantaneously gain power. If the Enabling Law was a government law passed that he could use over a long period of time to gain control then it would be long-term. ...read more.

Conclusion

With these political ideologies, Hitler pretty much appealed to everybody, so as a result many people decided to vote for his party. However, he never had enough votes to become Chancellor: at his height, in July 1932, he had 230 seats, insufficient for the majority of the control. He only got to where he was by appointment. The men who appointed him were ex-Chancellor Von Papen and President Hindenburg. Von Papen, who also had insufficient votes to be Chancellor, and Hindenburg wanted Hitler to be deputy. He refused because he wanted to be Chancellor. He got his way as the two men thought that he could be controlled. In January 1933, he became Chancellor and only two months afterwards he passed the Enabling Law. These people put him in a position of power, which he abused. He could pass any law he wanted now. One of the laws he chose to pass was the Enabling Law, which made him dictator. The Enabling Law, passed on March 23rd 1933, gave him the power to pass any law that he liked. Basically, it meant that rather than being Chancellor, he was now Fuhrer (dictator) of Germany and could rule without the German Parliament (the Reichstag). The formal term for this law was the "Gesetz zur Behebung der Not von Volk und Reich" (Law to remedy the distress of the people and the state). I think that the most important of these six causes was the Actions of Von Papen and Hindenburg. Had they not made him Chancellor, he would have not have been able to pass his own laws, including the Enabling Law, which made him the supreme leader of Germany. All the other campaign work he did: touring the country giving speeches, promises to resolve the depression and to destroying the treaty, although it did help somewhat, didn't get him voted into power because he was appointed. That being said, the Treaty of Versailles, the depression amongst other causes won him the support of the German people, which is invaluable if you want to become or are a leader. ...read more.

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