• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How did the Nazis enforce their Political power through the use of Propaganda, Indoctrination and terror?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How did the Nazis enforce their Political power through the use of Propaganda, Indoctrination and terror? After the Muinch Putsch Hitler gave up his idea of taking over Germany by using a well-known term revolution. The Nazi revolution would take place after Hitler had taken power. Hitler was opposed Chancellor in January 1933, but Hindenburg was still a position above Hitler. Hitler was the head of the coalition government. The election on 5th March 1933 gave the Nazi party an overall majority of 288 seats in the Reichstag. However this was still less than half and they needed two thirds of the vote to change the constitution legally. ...read more.

Middle

He was now in complete power. Hitler now started to enforce their political power through the use of propaganda, indoctrination and terror. Propaganda and indoctrination was their first priority and in 1933 the ministry for people's enlightenment and propaganda was born. This was under the presence of Dr Joseph Goebbel's. The ministry was responsible for all the propaganda throughout the country. Within the ministry there were several smaller departments, which specified with different forms of propaganda i.e. press, media and theatre. The ministry prevented the use of unwanted ideas. Schools and universities were informed that they could only teach a particular curriculum. Eventually everything would be Nazified and their first step into the creation of the master race had just taken place. ...read more.

Conclusion

Judge Freisler was a loyal member of the Nazi party from 1925 until his death in 1945; his view on justice was harsher than Hitler's. Punishments in Germany were ruthless and mass numbers of people were sentenced to death and executed for political opposition. Concentration camps came into use, which were filled with all types of threats to Germany. They included intellectuals, dissidents, communists homosexuals and of course Jews! Life in these camps was not easy in fact it was very harsh and tough to survive. Through time some of the concentration camps were changed into extermination camps (During World War II). All of these key elements combine together to create how the Nazis enforced their political power through the use of propaganda, indoctrination and terror! Arron Pollock 11RT ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. Hitler and the Nazis - how the Nazis gained power and how they used ...

    The threat of the SA: Inside his own party, Hitler had the threat from the SA. In 1930, Ernst Rohm was appointed leader of the SA to bring discipline to his private army. By 1934 the SA was huge and clearly had the ability to overthrow Hitler.

  2. HOW EFFECTIVE WERE INDOCTRINATION AND PROPAGANDA?

    Propaganda provided the highlights, indoctrination the main body. Indoctrination as a long-term process could be most effectively applied to Germany's youth. The methods used of indoctrinating youth were nothing if not thorough. Schools experienced a radlicalisation of the curriculum which saw the introduction of race study, eugenics and health biology, all used as vehicles for imparting Nazi ideology.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work