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How far do the levels of unemployment in the Weimar Republic explain the rise of the Nazi to power?

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Introduction

Theo St John Stevens 09/02/2011 How far do the levels of unemployment in the Weimar Republic explain the rise of the Nazis to power? I think that levels of unemployment can only explain the rise of Nazis power to a certain extent. There are a number of reasons why it can be argued that the rise of the Nazi's was caused by unemployment. The levels of unemployment rose (due to the 1929 Wall Street Crash) as so did the percentage of seats Nazi's held in the Reichstag. In 1928, before the Wall Street Crash, 10% of the population was unemployed. The Nazi's only had 12 seats which was 2.4% of the Reichstag.This shows that when unemployed levels were relatively low (10%) the Nazi's did not have many seats (12). However after the wall street crash the Nazi's gained in power. ...read more.

Middle

One of the greatest campaigning tools was Hitler. He appeals and attracted others because he was such an powerful orator.This meant that the Nazi's ideas which were not that favorable, were accepted and supported just because of the influential way in which Hitler spoke and gained peoples support. An reason why the Nazi's gained power was how they acted towards others, how others acted towards them and how they gained support. The Nazi's gained power by having a sense of flexibility. E.g. If one of there policies was criticized they would simply dropp it, when industrialist expressed concern towards nationalization of industries, the Nazi's simply dropped the policy. This meant that they could dodge criticism and keep the support of it's followers and portray no signs of weakness. The Nazi's made sure they always were better than there opposition. ...read more.

Conclusion

An example of a fear or dislike would be towards Jews and communism. The Nazi was very anti-Semitic and hated communism. This meant that people supported the Nazi's they gained in power. In conclusion I think that unemployment was a large factor in contributing to the rise in power of Nazism. This is shown how after the wall street crash of November 1929, as unemployment levels rose so did the support for the Nazi's. However there are other factors which caused the Nazi's rise to power. These include Negative Cohesion. People had the same fears as Nazi's. The great speeches from Hitler which gained them so much support. So I think that unemployment only caused a rise in Nazism to a certain extent because other factors had a major contribution to the rise of Hitler to chancellor in 1933. 0. Expand German Territory 0. Prop + Public speaking 0. Destroying the treaty of versailles 0. Kick out foreign 0. Idea about agree negative not positively ...read more.

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