• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

How realistic is a United Ireland in the context of past and present events? Support your answer by using your knowledge of the current situation and key historical events.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

How realistic is a United Ireland in the context of past and present events? Support your answer by using your knowledge of the current situation and key historical events. The current situation in Ireland is the division between the North of Ireland and the south of Ireland. This is the heart of the problem. Geographically Ireland is one country but politically there are two countries Northern Ireland that is part of the U.K and southern Ireland, which has been independent since 1921. There would be a solution to the problem by integration of Catholics and Protestants and Ireland becoming one country. Integration is the incorporation of disparate religious elements of the population into a unified society, providing equality of opportunity for all members of that society. This would mean that Catholics (nationalists) and Protestants (unionists) would join and live together. This would bring some to solutions to the problem but there would still be a division between the two religions. The situation today is under the Good Friday Agreement, which will try and provide equality in both religions. Today Ireland is still split by the division and recent events show young school children being subjected to violence because they had to walk through a protestant area to reach their catholic school. These children were only five years old and I think that this is not one of the ways to solve the problems in Ireland. The heart of the situation began cerca to the 15th century when Henry VIII ruled England and he began to alter the church, although fundamentally he did want to introduce Protestant doctrine. It was Henry's policy thus to conciliate the Irish and to leave them under their own laws. It was henrys alterations to religion, which has since caused all the conflict between Catholics and Protestants, which still is an on going situation today. Edward VI was Henry VIII's only son, he succeeded the throne in 1547. ...read more.

Middle

A truce agreed between the D�il and the British authorities in July 1921 led to negotiations in October-December and the signing of an agreement, the Anglo-Irish Treaty. This agreement provided that within one month of the establishment of an all-Ireland Region of the British Commonwealth, to be known as the Irish Free State. Later, in negotiations that led to the Anglo-Irish Agreement of 1938, the issue of partition was raised, to no effect. However, in July 1940 an offer of Irish unity was made, without the knowledge of the Northern Ireland government, by the administration of Winston Churchill, in return for Irish participation in World War II. Between 1954 and 1962 the IRA organized a campaign of cross-border raids. However, the persistence of discrimination against the Catholic Nationalist minority in Northern Ireland in relation to housing, employment, and the local government franchise provoked in the second half of the 1960s a civil rights campaign; and a hard-line response to this by the Northern Ireland government eventually led to rioting, to attacks on nationalist areas in Belfast, and to the introduction of the British army to restore order. This in turn led to a revival of the dormant IRA and to 25 years of terrorism and counter-terrorism. An increase of violence between Protestants and Catholics in Northern Ireland in the late 1960s was followed by the formation of the Provisional IRA. In the late 1970s and early 1980s the Irish government faced difficult problems: increased terrorism in the North by the provisional IRA. In 1985 the Anglo-Irish Treaty was brought in and signed by the English prime minister. Anglo-Irish Agreement was the official agreement on security cooperation between the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. The Agreement was a response to continuing violence in Northern Ireland between extremists from Catholic and Protestant communities, and to the continuing terrorist activities of the IRA, attended by growing Catholic support for the IRA's allied party, Sinn Fein. ...read more.

Conclusion

This majority as led to a lot of violence in the past. Would there be an end to the IRA because they make money from terrorism so the IRA would loose out on a lot of money. The IRA are a strong terrorist group with extremists would they be able to give this up for peace in Ireland. I think personally there will never be an end to the Ira, if this was such a big business and they made lots of money they wouldn't give all that up for a United. The British Government I think sees Ireland as a defence unit for Britain. If Britain help and try and give both nationalists and loyalist what they wanted they could probably bring in other terrorists groups and open fire in England. In every party there are moderate and extremists and if a solution was to be proposed the moderate people might agree but what is to say that the extremists would. The extremists are going to fight and put forward their views and use violence the moderates are willing to make sacrifices unlike the extremists. Realistically there will never be a solution. People are too strong-minded in their beliefs, which they have been given and brought up by parents and grandparents. They need to forgive and forget but it will never be that simple. Even if the government were to agree this doesn't mean to say that the people of Ireland will agree to it because they might not believe in the same things as the politicians do and to them it seems that they don't have a say on what happens in their country. It's the people in Ireland that need to come up with a solution, because it will affect their lives. I think that there might not be a solution because of the government even though they are only trying to help Ireland but if only the people were to have a say then their might be a solution out there and people themselves maybe willing to come together and live as one Irish State. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 essays

  1. Development of Irish Nationalism 1798-1921

    However, he was not aware that IRB men had penetrated the leadership of the party and held many senior positions, men like Pearse, who argued that it was an honour to die for one's country. 1916 Easter Rising To proclaim and independent Irish Republic and win the support of the Irish people.

  2. Conflict in Ireland

    the majority of the troops were Protestant, hence England being a Protestant country. The troops began to discriminate against the Catholics and at this, violence began to escalate. Catholics began to dislike the British as much as they resented the Protestants.

  1. Northern Ireland - The Good Friday Agreement was created in April 1998, and then ...

    * To the total disbarment of all paramilitary organisations. * To agree that such disarmament must be verifiable to the satisfaction of an independent commission. * To renounce for themselves, and to oppose any effort by others, to use force or threaten to use force, to influence the course of the outcome of all-party negotiations.

  2. What are the main differences between Republicans / Nationalists and Unionists / Loyalists?

    Basil Brooke explained that unionists believe everything they did to control Catholics was out of self-defence. When British troops were sent into Ireland many Catholics rejoiced: they believed the army would be a fairer police force than the RUC. However, the army soon began to get tough.

  1. Ireland - What are the main differences between the beliefs of the Republicans/Nationalists and ...

    two communities in the North and so hopefully generate more respect between them. It would also ensure that Ireland could no longer claim the North as part of its territory, yet still making sure there was a relationship between the North and South.

  2. In what ways did the Irish Question change between 1800 and 1922?

    The Great Famine affected the Irish Question in a significant way, because it caused the British Government to create Land Reforms. The Famine occurred in the years from 1845-9 and the response of the British Government was varied, because Sir Robert Peel did try to help but did not solve

  1. 'To what extent did Protestant support for an independent Ireland change in the period ...

    Many believe that there was a misinterpretation of the 1798 uprising as one against the Protestant ruling elite rather than the British who it was aimed at. The 1897 uprising and the war with Revolutionary France in 1799, Britain was aware of potential dangers if Ireland was to remain outside

  2. History Coursework: The continuing problems in Northern Ireland

    Some of them were shot in the back. Bloody Sunday provoked more hatred from the Nationalists than any other event mentioned above. However, it was a propaganda victory for the Republicans. The subject of Bloody Sunday would be one that would still be around 26 years later, when Tony Blair launched a new inquiry into the events.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work