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'In what ways did the British government attempt to hide the effects of the Blitz from the people of Britain?'

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Introduction

Coursework Question 3. 'In what ways did the British government attempt to hide the effects of the Blitz from the people of Britain?' The British government attempted to hide the effects of the Blitz from the British people in many ways. The most common was censorship. The government banned anything that would demoralise the public. They did not want to print anything that would make people feel as if they were being defeated. Many photographs and stories were not published until after the Blitz had ended. These actions were imposed after the Treachery Act was set up in 1940. It gave the government the right to imprison anyone who seemed likely to threaten the safety of the country. Therefore, anyone who did something that may demoralise people was imprisoned as a demoralised country was more likely to surrender. This Act stopped radio and newspapers revealing the full story of incidents. However, the public did not agree with the Act and it was quietly dropped but censorship still continued. The public knew they were not being told the whole story but they did not know how much was being kept from them. ...read more.

Middle

They would have felt like they were winning. The radio was the other main victim of censorship. Since there was no television, almost every home, and factory, had a radio. It provided people with music while they worked and broadcasts were often live from different factories over the country. This created a relaxed atmosphere for people and prevented them from becoming too stressful over the war. Winston Churchill often made speeches over the radio to the nation. He was the first to tell them of any major news but he always managed it to not sound too devastating. People trusted Churchill and believed what he told them. There was also the 'Forces' programme, which gave news and song requests among other things. It reassured people to have such a programme. A lot of the radio programmes featured on the radio were very propaganda orientated. Many were humorous to help the people stay relaxed and stress-free. 'It's That Man Again', the' Brains Trust' and 'Lord Haw Haw' were favourites. The 'Brains Trust' gave intellectuals a chance to talk about something other than the Blitz. It featured topics like literature, history and science. ...read more.

Conclusion

Documentaries were made about the voluntary service and praised them greatly. These films and documentaries provided a boost to people. They lifted their spirits and made them feel better about themselves. Another form of propaganda that the government endorsed was posters and leaflets. Leaflets and posters on all subjects would surround the people of Britain, trying to reassure them that everything is not as bad as it seems. They were constantly sent to people's homes and displayed where they would be seen most. It was to make the people feel better. Many topics were made to seem a lot better than they were. Evacuation, for example, was made to look a huge success with children enjoying themselves. The reality was very different. Many children were unhappy or homesick. Their parents could not know though as it would have given them greater stress and would have made them ill spirited. Only the good side of things was shown. All these efforts of censorship and propaganda were all in aid of keeping the country's morale and spirit up. The government did not want the British people to surrender so they did everything possible to keep them from doing so. The only way was to keep them in good spirits and to reassure them that it was not as bad as everything seems. Sara Porter ...read more.

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