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In what ways did the government attempt to hide the effects of the Blitz from the people of Britain?

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Introduction

In what ways did the government attempt to hide the effects of the Blitz from the people of Britain? In the Second World War the British government tried to hide the effects of the Blitz due to the fact they wanted to keep British peoples morale up, which stopped Hitler's main aim of the Blitz; to lower British people's morale until they gave up and beg the Nazis for an agreement. Also if they hid the effects of the blitz the Nazis would be unable to use the destruction and devastation in a propaganda campaign. The government hid the effects in two ways, firstly censorship. The government set up the Ministry of Information which controlled censorship, the ministry of information's role was to suppress news and views which should not be known, release or invents news which should be known and give writers special facilities to report what was happening. All of this therefore helped hide the effect of the blitz for the British public. ...read more.

Middle

The single most popular movie was Gone with the Wind, Mrs. Winifred Packman remembers how she emerged from the cinema "I was so moved by the film that when I came out tears were streaming down my face. An air raid warden stopped me and tried to comfort me thinking I was frightened by the raid. I tried to explain that it was only the film but I'm sure he didn't believe me." This shows that film in the war took there mind off what was happening around them, another quote which backs this up was from another Londoner "I shall never forget the night the Caf´┐Ż Anglais was hit. All hell was let loose that night. The corner block was down. A huge fire was blazing. Twenty or 30 fire engines were tearing around the square. And there was still a long queue of people waiting to see Gone with the Wind." Propaganda was also a big part of film they would show Germans as fascists, and in films such as Love story (1944) ...read more.

Conclusion

Wartime spirit on the factory floor was maintained through Music While You Work, this help hid the effects of the blitz because it would take their minds off what was going on around them. Also it increased production a managing director of one company wrote that "for an hour or and half after a programme, production increased by 12.5-15%. They also concentrated on dancing it was a great release from the grind of work, they wouldn't just dance in the night clubs of west London they would dance when ever they got the chance factory canteens, village halls and schools. Dancing even spread to the royal opera house which shows how dancing was promoted to get more people into it and therefore boosting morale. The arrival of the Americans in 1942 also saw the arrival of jitterbugging and jiving. This later become the most popular and energetic form of dancing in Britain, this form of dancing mad e people happy, energetic and full of enthusiasm for what every they had to do weather it was working in a factory or leaving for the front line the next day. Created by Danny Guilfoyle ...read more.

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