• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

increasing tension in europe between 1900 and 1914

Extracts from this document...


Increasing Tension In Europe Between 1900And 1914. There were many reason why tension increased in Europe between 1900 and 1914 contributing and or leading to the start of the first world war, including rivalry, the arms race, the alliance system and the Bosnia crisis and tension in eastern Europe. France had a large empire and felt threatened by Germany, Who was rapidly becoming the most important industrial country and wanted to build up a navy and empire to challenge the biggest and the best in the world. Germany had already stole land off France (Alsace and Lorrain) in the Franco Prussian war 1870-71 France worried about German development and the Germans feared invasion from France who wanted revenge. The rivalry increased between France and Germany in 1906 the German Kaiser promised to support morocco's independence this annoyed France who wanted morocco as part of her empire. ...read more.


Germany also got worried and started to form alliances the German Kaiser got annoyed with Britain for standing up for France at the algeciras conference in 1906 and blamed Britain for Germany's defeat. Britain and Germany also got involved in a navel race and an arms race. In 1900 when war was looking probable most of the great powers started to build up their armies, started to develop new technology and introduced conscription. The build up of armies meant that Germany was the strongest country in Europe. Although Russia had the largest of the armies they were the most ill equipped. Italy was weak, as it was a new country. Britain did not introduce conscription and so it was the only country who's number of soldiers fell 1900-1914 but Britain and France were expected to win any war as there soldiers had experience. Britain and Germany also had a navel race with the rapid building of dreadnoughts between 1906-1913 this was the main source of tension between ...read more.


These started as defensive agreements but soon became aggressive as the fact that they were only formal agreements was kept secret from the rival alliances, and so the rival powers did not know that the alliances were defensive and feared they were directed against them. This had an effect of increasing tension between the powers. Russia, Serbia and the Bolcan countries were all slaves, these were allies. Bosnia, which was also a Slav country, was taken over by Austria-Hungary in 1908. Serbia had hoped to form a super Slav state with Bosnia but was now unable to. Russia wanted to help Serbia get Bosnia back off Austria but Germany said that if Russia attacked Austria then Germany would attack Russia. Russia was too weak for this and so was forced to back down. Between 1908-1914 Serbia and Austria became big enemies. By 1914 war was almost certain to happen as tension was increasing all the time the two most important reasons for war happening were the Bosnian crisis and tension in Eastern Europe and the alliance system. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE International relations 1900-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE International relations 1900-1939 essays

  1. The Rise of Nation States in Europe

    * Socialists lost the mass support. * Finally, in the next election, liberals won the election and became the majority in the new Constituent Assembly and the Second Republic was set up. * The new Republic decided: 1. To abolish the workshop 2.

  2. There was no general war (i.e. one involving all the great powers at the ...

    Douglas Dakin suggests that Metternich, the Austrian, and Castlereagh, the British representative justified their leniency on the grounds that "a moderate peace best served the interests of a European balance of power."3 The results of the Congress itself, having successfully dealt with France, and re-drawing many of the borders across

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work