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jack the ripper

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Introduction

GCSE HISTORY COURSEWORK THE MURDERS OF JACK THE RIPPER 3. Study Sources D and E. How useful are Sources D and E in helping you to understand why the Ripper was able to avoid capture? Source D is taken from evidence given by Elizabeth Long at the inquest into the death of Annie Chapman. In the source she is describing the man seen talking to Annie before she was killed. The source tells us that the man Annie was seen talking to was "shabby genteel". It also describes him as being dark complexioned, wearing a deerstalker hat, being taller than Annie and about 40. ...read more.

Middle

At the time of the Ripper, Whitechapel was full of Jewish people and people of different nationalities. A lot of small businesses in Whitechapel were run by foreigners so there would have been a lot of people who fitted Elizabeth Long's description of a " dark complexioned foreigner". He might have been able to avoid capture because there were so many nationalities and races in Whitechapel that he blended in and would not have stood out. In the overcrowded conditions and unlit alley ways in Whitechapel, the Ripper would have easily been able to avoid the police Source E is part of an article published in a local newspaper after the murders of Polly Nicholls and Annie Chapman. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the source Whitechapel is described as " thoroughfares connected by a network of narrow, dark and crooked lanes. Everyone apparently containing some headquarters of infamy. The sights and sounds are an apocalypse of evil". The source suggests that the local police force may have been inefficient. The source says "my informant was referred from one police office to another, but without making any impression". The source suggests that Whitechapel was such a rough place "an apocalypse of evil" that the police may have been too frightened to go out in the narrow, dark alleys of Whitechapel at night by themselves,` or that there were too few of them to patrol Whitechapel at night. All these facts would have made it easier for the Ripper to avoid capture. ...read more.

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