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Life During The Blitz.

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Introduction

Life During The Blitz The Blitz was the sustained German bombing campaign against London and other British cities during World War II, from September 1940 to mid-1941, in which over 43,000 British citizens lost their lives. The Blitz was named after the German blitzkrieg strategy of mobile offensive warfare, though it was not a specific example of this. Since the end of World War II the Blitz has been celebrated in popular British culture as an example of the courage and resilience of the British people, and of Londoners in particular, during a crucial period when the British Isles stood alone against the might of the German armed forces, the Wehrmacht. The following is an extract taken from a speech made by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill in the June of 1940. "We shall not flag or fail. We shall go on to the end. We shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, We shall fight growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender." ...read more.

Middle

This is one of the main problems for young historians researching the blitz as there is no real way for them to know, therefore they must trust the resources they are presented with, meaning that they are often researching incorrect material. Source 21 is written by a housewife in her diary of 1942. It talks of how women who have done "worthwhile things" during the war "settling to trivial ways" The diary is written in a way that is almost longing to do housework. During the war, when the men were away fighting many jobs became vacant and these were filled by women usually confined to the household. New jobs also became avaliable, for example in munitions factories and aircraft factories. The were also filled by women. In America this was encouraged by the government creating the poster character, 'Rosie the Riveter'. Rosie the Riveter was depicted as an attractive, rosy-cheeked woman dressed in work clothes, designed to make the idea of working outside the home attractive and comfortable. She made it seem patriotic rather than unfeminine to work outside the home. With the help of the Rosie the Riveter publicity campaign, more than 6 million women joined the workforce during the war. When the war ended in 1945 most of the women lost their jobs, but it made working outside of the home more acceptable. ...read more.

Conclusion

There were few youngsters in that first platoon of ours...' Whilst historian AJP Taylor summarised their role in his own way, from his book, English history, 1914-45: 'The Home Guard harassed innocent civilians for identity cards; put up primitive road blocks, the traces of which may delight future archaeologists; and sometimes made bombs out of petrol tins. In a serious invasion, its members would presumably have been massacred if they had managed to assemble at all. Their spirit was willing though their equipment was scanty. Churchill proposed to launch the slogan: 'You can always take one with you' if the Germans landed...' So, I have shown how life changed dramatically for the citizens of 'Royal Britannia' during the war and how it changed the lives of people forever. It liberated women from the home, it brought us 'Dads Army' but most important of all it brought a nation together, the likes of which we have never seen since. "We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender." Winston L S Churchill. Theo Cowen 'The Blitz' History Coursework Mrs. Jones 11GMH 9th November 2003 ...read more.

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