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Rise of Absolutism in France. In France the efforts to establish an absolute monarchy were much more successful in France than in England because of many reasons.

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Introduction

Rise of Absolutism In France the efforts to establish an absolute monarchy were much more successful in France than in England because of many reasons. The first being the foundation for a successful absolute monarchy was laid by the rulers of France before Louis XIV. The centralization of government that Louis XIV controlled also led to the peak of absolutism in France. There were also many other contributing elements such as how the absolute monarchy still had some limitations and power sharing and how Louis XIV enforced the divine right of kings. Whereas in England, the Kings (primarily Charles I and James II) decided to act without consent from their people. ...read more.

Middle

He became the embodiment of an absolutist rule. In England Charles I decided to tax the people and make laws without their consent (not even representative consent). This was a particularly bad move in England where the people were well represented in a governing body called Parliament. Parliament was well organized, wealthy, mostly secular, and overall quite powerful. It represented England as a whole and not the separate states of England or provinces of England. James II met the same odds when he decided to be Catholic; and that since he was king, he could decide that Catholicism was allowed in England even though there were members of the official Church of England and a number of Protestant Puritans in the country as well as in Parliament. ...read more.

Conclusion

These differences were the reason that absolutism was effective in France but not in England. In conclusion, there were many factors that contributed to the success of an absolute monarchy in France but not in England. In France the rulers before Louis XIV laid very strong groundwork for an absolute monarchy and in England Charles I took advantage of his people and failed to effectively enforce an absolute monarchy. As Louis XIV came to power he had absolute control while sharing powers effectively whereas Charles I was fighting against his own country for complete power. These events and conditions were the cause of the success of absolutism in France and the failure in England. ...read more.

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