• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Stalingrad: February 1943 – The German Defeat Sources Questions

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Stalingrad: February 1943 - The German Defeat Sources Questions Does Source A explain the reasons for the German surrender at Stalingrad? Explain your answer using Source A and your own knowledge I think that A explains the reasons for the German defeat reasonably well, as there is no reason why Paulus should now lie, as he knew that he was facing defeat. However, I cannot be sure as to whether or not he was still loyal to Hitler. Paulus would have had first hand knowledge as to what was going on, and I know that the stated reasons for defeat were in fact occurring. This was because Hitler was not sending enough reinforcements, and those that he did send did not make it through. The results were that the troops starved, and that the German lines collapsed. This would comply with what Paulus is saying, and that fact that he is requesting immediate surrender shows the desperation of the situation. Therefore, I would say that he is telling the truth and that the basis for the defeat is given, although it is not in very much detail. It is possible that Paulus wanted to glorify his defeat by showing that he went down in the best way possible, although he clearly had not wanted to fight to the end, still showing that the source is reasonably unbiased, as Paulus can be said to have been loyal, at the end, to his own troops only. ...read more.

Middle

Source E is from a German broadcast of 1943. Source F is from a Soviet school textbook. Why are these interpretations about the end of the Battle of Stalingrad so different? Explain using Sources E and F and your own knowledge. Firstly, I think that the two sources are so different because of their different target audiences. The broadcast, most likely aimed at those related to the 6th Army, and the German public, would have wanted to boost morale and possibly to comfort the loved ones of the dead. They would also want to show that they did not die in vain, and that their efforts were not lost - so this would mean that they would need to give a very biased report, and show that they did their best, but that the Russians were unstoppable. The source would have been written to show the Germans in the best light possible, as well as saying that they had done good, etc. F, however, shows almost the opposite view - from the point of view of the Russians - that the Germans were defiant, despite their offers of surrender. It then goes on to show figures for the captures, etc. of the Germans, and these would seem to be reasonably reliable from my external knowledge. ...read more.

Conclusion

As B shows, it was important that Russia won to improve the morale of the public, and to prove that Russia was again strong. Sources such as C could suggest that Germany never really stood much chance when it was surrounded, as the Russians used powerful tactics. This would suggest that the Germans were not morally strong enough, and perhaps that the Russians fought harder for the defeat, as it was on their homeland. C also shows the realisation in the soldiers that Hitler was not the great tactician that everybody though he was - they had been deceived by Hitler. The German announcement of their defeat would seem not to care too much for the loss of the actual city and the chances to win the oilfields, but beneath this the Germans knew that without this oil, they could not hold out against the Allies for much longer without these much needed supplies. Also is the view that without the Russian defeat, much more work would have been needed to be done by the Western Allies, which is probably why the Western cartoonist thought well of the Russian attack. It was probably also important for the Russians to win in order that they could spread the ideas of Communism much further, through a badly weakened East. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Britain 1905-1951 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Britain 1905-1951 essays

  1. Britain And The Western Front - Sources Questions

    There were many diseases that ran rife in the trenches; dysentery and some times cholera and scurvy. When you attacked you had to attack straight at the front because there was no way around the enemy trenches. There was very little chance of survival due to the mass of enemy

  2. Dunkirk - Defeat, Deliverance or Victory?

    This piece of evidence also disagrees with many other sources. From my background I know that planes bombed soldiers on the beach vigorously and many men perished during operation Dynamo. So I conclude that this source is unreliable. Many historians thought that Dunkirk was a natural victory due to the

  1. How important were Haig's tactics in bringing an end to WW1?

    to handicap British industry; and to destroy the morale of the civilian population. The raids caused much loss of life and damage to property but accomplished little of military value. From the middle of 1915 aerial combats between planes or squadrons of planes of the belligerents were common.

  2. Jarrow: questions 3, 4 and 5 (sources)

    being held all over the country" so Jarrow might have wanted to get involved and wanted publicity. also it was the only thing that they could have done. The people had nothing left and no other solution. The Jarrow crusade and other marches like it didn't bring any benefits-but it

  1. Dunkirk - Defeat, Deliverance or Victory?

    The casualties and loss of men suffered by the British on the beaches of Dunkirk cannot be ignored. An account of a German Pilot gives things from another perspective, without having to be aware of British government propaganda. It is the first of it's kind and the pilot recalls how

  2. Why did the Germans become involved in the Battle of Stalingrad?

    This was given back to the Russians under the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, the Treaty was very harsh on Germany very harshly in the opinion of most Germans and especially Hitler. Therefore Hitler wanted to avenge the Treaty and this was to become one of his major aims when he came to power in 1939.

  1. Women's Suffrage Sources Questions

    They believed in persuasion, peaceful marches, and making speeches. They would also canvass MP's to try and get their vote. The Suffragettes inevitably helped the Suffragists with their campaign, by keeping the matter in the public eye. But Fawcett did say that she believed that women were not behaving the

  2. Gallipoli Questions

    I also think that this source illustrates how poorly the campaign was planned, as it is quite clear when one looks at a map, how narrow the Dardanelles were. Source H again tells us about the complete lack of intelligence regarding maps and how it affected the troops.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work