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The sources A-F all show the different impact and success of Volksgemeinschaft in Germany between 1933-1939. By using varying links and contradictions between all of these sources I will try to determine the success and failure of Nazi Vloksgemeinschaf.

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Introduction

The sources A-F all show the different impact and success of Volksgemeinschaft in Germany between 1933-1939. By using varying links and contradictions between all of these sources I will try to determine the success and failure of Nazi Vloksgemeinschaft. Volksgemeinschaft when translated means "peoples community". It was the Nazi ideology to try and create a perfect German society, which would be united through different factors, including race, blood and traditional values. Hitler's aim was to create a class-less society and return German people to a rural way of life; this in turn would lead to a total loss of individuality. This society included the creation of a "master race", or "Herrenvolk", of Aryan Germans, this would include Hitler's ideal humans whose characteristics must of included, blonde hair, blue eyes and a strong athletic build. This was thought to be based on Darwin's theory of evolution, stating that the white male was the most highly evolved being. The nazi propaganda poster and Melita Maschmann both show the Nazi commitment to creating unity and ultimately achieving their main goal of Volksgemeinschaft. ...read more.

Middle

The subjective view in a satirical tone also affects the reliability of his comments. However, in contrast, Ian Kershaw's cynical view of the Nazi success in creating Volksgemeinschaft highlights the lack of any "social revolution". He refers to how Nazi ideology and values had barely any affect on the German publics consciousness. This is shown as the German people continued with traditional class-values which the Nazi's aimed to abolish. Similar to this, Phillip Gibbs who was a non-German journalist gives his account of indifference in Berlin 1034. He explains how "no one in the crowded caf� listened to Adolf Hitler" when a Nazi broadcast was on the radio. This supports the idea that people of the German community were not affected by Nazi ideas. However, Gibbs only gives an account of one caf�, this does not give a fair representation of the whole Germany. There is evidence which shows some did accept Nazi ideology but it cannot be found in this source. Gibbs account also highlights the failure to create Volksgemeinschaft nationally, which was ultimately the Nazi's main aim. ...read more.

Conclusion

As Kershaw is a respected Nazi Germany historian his source quite rightly contains a lot of information on the area of Volksgemeinschaft. Although because of his experience with this area of history he is subjective, like many other historians, as he will of created his own views on the subject over time. In conclusion I believe that the impact of Volksgemeinschaft policy on those inside it was not always as intended, and although the Nazi's had some success, the failure to create national unity was a huge failure and Nazi's were unable to prevent opposition in peoples minds. Mainly the sources show the failure of Volksgemeinschaft, although you do get aspects of success. It is clear that the differing views and opinions found in the sources show the different experiences of those involved at the time, different perceptions of the past and also the lack of sources. It would be impossible to get an accurate view of the past from six sources and the question could never be answered fully, also the success of Volkgemeinschaft can never be accurately determined, as any interpretations of the past will always contain aspects of subjections. By Richard Carter 12/5 ...read more.

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