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There were many reasons why women had failed to gain the vote between 1900 and 1914. In the years before 1900, fifteen bills for women's suffrage had been put to parliament.

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Introduction

Jason Defreitas History Coursework 17/01/02 There were many reasons why women had failed to gain the vote between 1900 and 1914. In the years before 1900, fifteen bills for women's suffrage had been put to parliament. Every time the bill failed. The bills were being put forward by a group of women known as the suffragists. The lack of success annoyed many suffragists and by 1903, Ms Emmeline Pankhurst created another organisation of women known as the suffragettes. Ms Pankhurst believed the new organisation must become more radical and militant if they were to succeed in gaining the vote. To begin the suffragettes disrupted political meetings and pestered ministers. But when more suffrage bills were thrown out of parliament, the suffragettes become louder and more annoying. ...read more.

Middle

MP's who supported the suffragettes became turned off. MP's felt they should not give the vote because of their radical ways. Emmeline Pankhurst's daughter, Christabel Pankhurst tried to join the suffragettes and the suffragists together as one big party again. Mrs Fawcett(leader of the Suffragists) did not want the suffragists to be associated with the Suffragettes and their militancy and refused to join. Not joining together was a major set back in the campaign and was a major reason for not receiving the vote by 1914. All MP's were worried about giving women the vote; they were worried on which party the women would vote for. The Liberals were the most worried as the majority of the population able to vote (over21) would be women. Men were 47.3% of the population women being the other 52.7%. ...read more.

Conclusion

These factors were the main reasons for the women not receiving the vote between 1900 and 1914. The reasons caused other reasons and all the reasons that stopped women's suffrage before the war. The biggest reason though was peoples view on equality of the sexes. The public and MP's and even the other women felt that men were higher than women. This thought in people mind was the biggest reason. A quote about equality from and MP shows a typical view. He says, "If women did gain the vote, it would mean that most voters would be women ... what is the good of talking about equality of the sexes? The first whiz of the bullet, the first boom of the cannon where is the equality of the sexes then?" This shows his view very clearly. That is why women did not receive the vote between 1900 and 1914. By Jason Defreitas ...read more.

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