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These sources are not about Haig and the Battle of the Somme. How far do you agree hat they have no use for the historians studying Haig and the Battle of the Somme?

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Introduction

History Coursework Coursework 2C Study Source D and E. These sources are not about Haig and the Battle of the Somme. How far do you agree hat they have no use for the historians studying Haig and the Battle of the Somme? Source D is useful to us as it is based on true historical events. Even though truth is exaggerated people know what events are being talked about. Source D is a picture form Black adder once popular war comedy. It is being useful as it shows different opinions about war and General Haig, who in this source is directly referred to as "Field Marshall Haig is about to.." it also gives us some historical facts like "six inches closer to the enemy" it in the funny and sarcastic way explains to us that Britain haven't gained too much land during Battle Of The Somme. ...read more.

Middle

The second source(source E) is also biased towards Haig but might be more useful as it was not written or drew to entertain as such. So when comparing those two sources we might say that the next source is more of a use to historians. Source E is a cartoon from a British magazine published in February 1917.It is again really biased like the first source we had look at towards Haig. The cartoon is not so bad as such is the writing after it which is full of biased comments towards the general. On the picture we can see a soldier looking like drawn from Haig's profile and underneath it there is a piece of text. ...read more.

Conclusion

The drawbacks on this source are that its creator seems not to like Haig and make him look stupid and unspecialised. So there also might be a bit of a truth lack showing Haig from his good side. I personally think that it is actually useful for historians to study both of those sources as they show different views about Haig. It teaches historians what people in Britain who should support the army and it's General during the times of war, had actually been saying and showing to the public. It shows historians what people felt as well as what they saw Haig as. So I don't think we can say that they are useless to historians studying Battle of the Somme. ?? ?? ?? ?? Work by: Anika Kloska 10 SG ...read more.

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