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Unemployment and Nazi success in elections.

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Introduction

Unemployment and Nazi success in elections The Nazis weren't very successful in the late 1920's because this period of time, being prior to the economic crisis, the Weimar Government was doing fairly well under the leadership of Stresemann and Germany's future looked hopeful for a while. But when the economy took a turn for the worse, Germany was desperate, therefore many Germans felt that it was the right time to vote for a different party. The Nazis were quick to take advantage of the economic problems that the Weimar Government faced and started to market themselves as "the party that may have the solutions to Germany's many problems." After the Wall Street Crash in late 1929, the Nazis gained 107 seats in the Reichstag, 95 more seats than they had gained two years previously and then in July 1932, the Nazis gained 230 seats in the Reichstag. Germany was very badly affected by the depression and since 1929, unemployment had been on the rise. ...read more.

Middle

are linked closely, because it was Weimar's failure to deal with the depression that allowed the Nazis to seize their opportunity and put their new, more peaceful and caring approach into action. The Nazis opened soup kitchens and places to stay for the homeless people, who had been badly hit by the economic crisis, and promised improvement for the working class and farmers who had also been badly affected. There was already Hitler Youth and The Nazi Students' League that strongly encouraged Nazi beliefs from a very early age. As well as targeting these groups, the majority groups were targeted (the middle and working classes) who at that time were fearful of communism and economic ruin. Hitler also had the backing of the rich and powerful industrialists, which was very important as the industrialists contributed to some of Hitler's financial backing, without which he couldn't have fought his expensive election campaigns. The Nazis also offered to their targeted groups, what all Germans needed at the time of crisis - a scapegoat. ...read more.

Conclusion

Because the system of proportional representation was being used, many parties, all with contrasting views, formed the coalition. They just quarreled among themselves, not agreeing with each other's views with no-one being willing to be associated with unpopular measures, rather than simply agreeing that Hitler and the Nazis were posing a threat and uniting to face the Nazis' challenge. If they had have agreed to work together to try to overthrow Hitler and the Nazis, then the Nazis may not have eventually gained an overall majority. The Nazis had views that the majority of Germans agreed with, including their anti-Semitist, anti-Marxist and anti-Communist stances. Basically, the Nazis stood for what the people of Germany wanted. The Nazis policies were often very vague, repeating ideas that were popular and never again repeating unpopular ideas. Many Germans were unsure of what the Nazis stood for, but trusted that they'd keep their promises and that was what mattered. Hitler's promises that he would "make Germany great again" were good enough for most Germans. ...read more.

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