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Using some of the cause in the lust and explain how both long term and short term causes contributed to Hitler’s rise to power

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Introduction

Using some of the cause in the lust and explain how both long term and short term causes contributed to Hitler's rise to power The long-term causes of Hitler's rise to power in 1933 were The Treaty Of Versailles, The economic depression and his oratory, personality and leadership skills. The short-term causes were the decision by Von Papen and Hindenburg to appoint Hitler as chancellor in 1933 and the enabling law in 1933.A short-term cause would be something that would have an immediate impact on him. So a long-term cause would be something that would have a quick impact on him, but it would have an effect of a long period of time. The long-term cause of Hitler rising to power was the Treaty of Versailles. It had a big effect of the nation of Germany. It had affected them when they were first hit with the reparations bill of 6.6bn and the loss of all overseas colonies and land from their own nation. ...read more.

Middle

If the economic depression had not have hit then Hitler could have been quite possibly faded out because of only have to be able to talk about the hatred of the Versailles treaty. This is a long-term cause because the economic depression gave him something to talk about so that was the immediate effect and the long-term affect was that he had something to offer the people, which was what he directed his oratory towards. The short-term causes of Hitler's rise to power were the decision by von Papen and Hindenburg to appoint him chancellor in 1933. He wouldn't have been appointed chancellor if it weren't for the long-term causes of his oratory skills because these got him far, and he gained backing in the Reichstag. Von Papen and Hindenburg were really forced in to making the decision to make him chancellor because the previous chancellors before Hitler wasn't getting the support they needed in the Reichstag in order to get the laws passed so they choose Hitler because of the support he had. ...read more.

Conclusion

helped him when the economic depression of 1929 hit. This was because he had something else to direct his oratory too, other than the Versailles treaty; this also gave him a chance to tell the people what they wanted to hear. No economic depression, nothing fro Hitler to talk about, so this would therefore mean he would have been out of favor and then fazed out. His skills (oratory, personality and leadership) also aided him when he was made chancellor because if he weren't made chancellor then he would not have been able to pass the enabling law with the majority of the votes in the Reichstag. So I think that those combination of links there states that if just one of these had been absent, then he wouldn't have been as successful as he was. If the leadership skills were absent then he would not have been able to lead Germany into the Second World War. So it is not an individual reason for his rise to power, it's a combination of reasons. ...read more.

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