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Using some of the causes in the list explain how both long-term and short-term causes contributed to Hitler's rise to power.

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Introduction

History coursework Question 2. Using some of the causes in the list explain how both long-term and short-term causes contributed to Hitler's rise to power. Both long-term and short-term causes contributed to Hitler's rise to power in many ways. The treaty of Versailles was a long-term cause .It caused chaos in Germany many years after the terms were agreed. The Germans from the beginning hated it. Hitler often spoke how he wanted to get rid of the treaty, when he addressed his rallies, this also makes it a short-term cause as it was spoken about in Hitler's speeches at that point in time. Hitler made it matter to him, therefore it would seem sufficient to the current situation in Germany between 1923 and 1933. The conclusion of which was that the German people thought it Hitler cared about them and wanted to make life better for them, which made him more popular. The Munich Putsch contributed to Hitler's rise to power enormously. ...read more.

Middle

The decision by Papen and Hindenburg to appoint Hitler, as chancellor is a short-term inter-acted with long-term cause. The decision is short-term because at that stage Papen and Hindenburg were not sure on making Hitler chancellor but they secretly met up with industrialists, army leaders and politicians to discus the situation, and stupidly thinking they could control Hitler offered him the post of chancellor, making this only relevant to the current situation in the short-term future. At the same time there decision is long-term because they now could not go back on what they agreed about Hitler being chancellor, even if they cant control his actions, the decision was made and the future would now be Hitler the chancellor of Germany, a dictator. Both these long and short-term causes were necessary and extremely significant to contributing to Hitler's rise to power, by making Hitler higher as chancellor, with more authority than ever before. It seemed nothing would stand in the way of Hitler, once he was a dictator, not Hindenburg or anyone else could stop him. ...read more.

Conclusion

Long-term and short-term cause, they all affected Hitler's rise to power in good ways and bad some more than others. In my opinion long-term causes affected Hitler more, as it was for a longer period of time and often showed which path for the future he was taking. Every step Hitler took, he was gaining more popularity, he made himself be seen and heard by all Germans he would do whatever it would take to rule Germany, all he wanted to do now was to have a complete Nazi Germany. Every little fact since 1918 added up slowly to Hitler becoming chancellor of Germany its what he was working towards all his life now that he had achieved that he need new aims. Hitler now had the future to deal with, now he had gained power he had to keep it, it wouldn't be too hard for Hitler. In my opinion both long and shot-term causes were equally as important as each other to Hitler's rise to power. All the causes helped a manipulative man get his own way. Elana Klinger ...read more.

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