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Was The Weimar Doomed From The Start?

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Introduction

The Weimar Republic got off to a bad start. In 1918, the government signed the armistice. They were given the name 'The November Criminals', as the German public viewed them as traitors to there country. This made most Germans angry with the government. This followed the terrible conditions in Germany in the last months of World War I. The economy was hit hard: German production was crippled. Food and supplies could not be traded because of hostilities, and starvation spread across the German nation. The moral of the people, as well as the armed forces, was very low. The military had rebelled and mutinied against its superiors at Kiel, and the navy had refused to mount a suicidal attack on the British Navy. These bad conditions were intensified when the Kaiser, the German monarch, abdicated, and fled Germany. A new government was hurriedly created, and was called the Weimar Republic. This was because fighting had broken out in Berlin, and the only safe place for the Government to hold session was Weimar. The Republic was led by the largest political party at the time, the Social Democrats. They set up the most democratic system in the world at that time. ...read more.

Middle

The President at the time made a risky deal with the Senior Staff of the military. He would allow the old army to exist, in return for their assistance in quelling the Sparticist rebellion. The rebellion was destroyed: Rosa and Karl were both murdered, and the fighting ended. But the old army was deeply against the Weimar, feeling they had been betrayed. The deal to allow the old, anti-Weimar generals to continue service, instead of being replaced by men more sympathetic to the Republic, was a bad move by the government. Also, the Social Democrats were now hated by the Communists, and would be a constant threat to the republic. This meant that the left-wing parties of the republic would refuse to co-operate. This was a great setback, and made the right-wing side of politics, like the Nazis, more powerful. The friction between the Democrats and the Communists led to a series of revolts in Berlin and Bavaria. All over the area, the Communist party organised strikes and riots, breaking down government control. A new communist republic was set up in Bavaria. They took money and land from the rich and distributed it to the lower classes. ...read more.

Conclusion

Public unrest and hatred marked its entrance to power, and many disliked the Republic from the start. The Weimar was forced to make dangerous pacts with the military to repress their political rivals, but this led to Putsch's in the capital. Without a strong army, the government was forced to turn to the people time and time again to resolve problems. The Weimar Republic was not in favour with the people, and they only co-operated because they were facing a mutual foe. But the government returned this favour with betrayal, in the form of the economic crisis. The Weimar failed Germany, and it wasn't likely the people would forgive them. But the all these problems stemmed from things beyond the governments control. At the end of the war, Germany was in critical conditions, but the Weimar stepped in and saved the country they had inherited. They set the country on the right course, and established a system that on the surface looked favourable to Germany in that it was democratic. But fundamental flaws in the constitution and the style of government itself weaken the Weimar Republic. The Treaty Of Versailles was hard on Germany and the Allies were indifferent to this fact. But all things considered, the problems facing the Weimar were generally within their power to resolve, but it was their mistakes, hyperinflation, overpowering the military and a slow government, that ...read more.

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