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What can you learn from source A about Jarrow in the early 1930s?

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Introduction

What can you learn from source A about Jarrow in the early 1930s? From looking at source A I can learn that Jarrow is a poor area. Source A is a description of Jarrow written in the early 1930's. The depression hit Britain very hard as by 1932 there were 3,000,000 people out of work in Britain. This is around the time that the description of Jarrow was written. It says that: ''there was no prospect of a job and the streets were becoming dilapidated''. This is hinting that Jarrow was becoming run down. You can tell that Jarrow was badly affected from the depression. The author said that he was unemployed from 1922 until 1929, where he became a Jarrow councilor. This means that he was unemployed for seven years. ...read more.

Middle

From this I can see that this person was very poor and the depression has affected this person's area very hard. This shows that even with the unemployment benefit they do not even have the money to feed all of their family. There was obviously not enough money to buy food. Source A tells us that they had no money and the effects of the depression came crashing down on them by saying, ''Then in 1931 everything went bankrupt''. This is implying that he does not know why everything went bankrupt, and it is suggesting that it was sudden. Everything went bankrupt because on October 24th 1929 the market went down and within a year 2.5 million people had lost their jobs. This source is not useful as reading the description of Jarrow I do not know who wrote it. ...read more.

Conclusion

This shows that there was poverty in Jarrow. They clearly had a hard time and not enough money. From looking at the sentence ''in the town 156 shops were closed or empty'' I learn that the people who owned shops could not afford to keep it running as they had no customers because their customers couldn't afford to buy anything. Overall I can learn that Jarrow in the early 1930's was extremely poor as everything went bankrupt due to the depression because this was written at about the same time as when the depression hit Britain. I can see that no-one had any money to buy food and clothes; this suggests that many, like the person who wrote the description, were unemployed. The people in Jarrow suffered in many ways because nobody had any money. If they had no money then they could not buy essentials like food. ...read more.

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