• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What is the long-term history of relations between mainland Britain and Northern Ireland?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What is the long-term history of relations between mainland Britain and Northern Ireland? When Elizabeth I reigned there was already a sense of unrest in Ireland. Many Irish Catholic lords rebelled against Protestantism and English rule. Elizabeth was afraid that Ireland would ally with England's Catholic enemies. She was determined to rule Ireland firmly. The Elizabethan attempt to conquer Ireland ended in 1601. To reward her Protestant supporters Elizabeth gave them lands taken from the Catholic Irish rebel leaders. King James I took this plantation of Ireland by loyal Protestants further. He began a full-scale plantation of Ulster in 1609. Scottish and English Protestant were encouraged to settle on land taken away from Catholics. All they had to do was take an oath of loyalty. The Battle of the Boyne was the decisive battle in the struggle between Ex-king James II of England and his successor, William III, for control of Ireland. ...read more.

Middle

The Duke of Wellington (who was Prime Minister) and the Home Secretary Robert Peel wanted to avoid rebellion. They persuaded King George IV and parliament to pass the Catholic Emancipation Act in 1829, which would allow Catholics to enter Parliament as MPs. Daniel O'Connell wanted an end to the Act of Union. Towards the end of the 1870's Irish farmers had two severe blows. One was the competition from North America which began to send cheap corn to Europe so farmers had to lower prices to compete. This led to the farmers being unable to pay the rent to their Tenants. The Land League was set up to campaign for lower rents and protection against evictions. This was popular among Catholics and Protestants because it forced politicians to take notice of the suffering of the tenant farmers. By the end of the 19th Century many Protestant landlords were selling off their land. ...read more.

Conclusion

To win Unionist support it was agreed to dely Home Rule until the war was over. 5500 Ulstermen died in the battle of Somme. Unionists were willing to fight to stay British so it would disable the British Government forcing Ulster to join an all-Ireland Republic after the First World War. At the end of the War of Independence, where Nationalists killed those who fought on the side of the British, Nationalist leaders, Michael Collins and Arthur Griffith, were offered a peace treaty by the British Government. This treaty would allow Ireland to have the same constitutional status in the community of Great Britain. Although they were a free state the treaty stated that in time of war of 'strained relations with a foreign power' the British Government could call up on their defences for help. Many had problems with this because they felt that it still brought them into the British Empire and acknowledges that Britain was the direct monarch of Ireland and the governing authority. Question 1 Max Buadi ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 essays

  1. What were the short and long term effects of the hunger-strikes in Northern Ireland?

    The Northern Ireland Office indicated to republicans that concessions would be made on issues of clothing and prison work requirements if the strike was called off. However Margaret Thatcher, the newly elected Conservative Prime Minister, said that "I want this to be utterly clear - the government will never concede

  2. Irish History

    They wanted to put an end to the Irish - British connection. Their aim was to use peaceful methods to win independence for Ireland. The British had mistakingly called the leaders of the Easter Rising 'Sinn F�iners' and refered to the 1916 'Sinn F�in Rebellion,' even though the group had very little to do with the Rising.

  1. The History of Conflict in Ireland.

    They become self sufficient communities. Not only do they have the barricades to keep the army out but they produce their own media. They have their own private radios, they have their own local broadsheets in which they tell each other what is going on.

  2. Conflict in Ireland

    In order to try and work towards reuniting Ireland peacefully a Council of Ireland with members from the North and South was set up. Northern Ireland consisted of the six North Eastern counties, which made up Ulster.

  1. Why has it taken so long for the different groups in the peace process ...

    an unarmed strategy for removing Britain from Ireland." * In the past ceasefires and peace negotiations have caused problems for the IRA leading to splits. These new breakaway groups have refused to stop fighting. A long-term example of this is after the 1921 treaty. The IRA split, as did Sinn Fein because some accepted that the treaty was

  2. In this essay I am going to try and decide whether the cause of ...

    This is a very important cause of the conflicts that broke out in 1969 because Nationalist anger was fuelled by the fact that the marchers were celebrating a Catholic defeat. These battles put the Protestants in complete control of Ireland.

  1. Northern Irelandsince c.1960 - questions and answers

    Also his successor Brook, did not have a single Catholic employed when he came into power, he believed Catholics were "Out to destroy with all their might and power" This generated major problems for Catholics in Northern Ireland as a result Catholics were discriminated against.

  2. Nationalism In Britain

    The succession of James VI of Scotland to the English throne in 1603 ensured that Scottish and English interests remained closely entangled throughout the 17th century. The Union with Scotland in 1707 created a British state, though Scottish nationalists have always regarded the Act as a betrayal.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work