• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What Was the effect of the Great Famine on Ireland?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What Was the effect of the Great Famine on Ireland? The Great famine is without doubt one of the lowest parts of Irish history. It destroyed both mentally and physically many parts of Ireland. Historians have often argued over the true lasting effects of the Great famine. I will try to determine the real effect the Great famine had on Ireland. The most obvious effect is that of the decrease in the total population of Ireland. Estimates range from a decrease of 3 million to 4 million of the total population. With the total population being around 8 million at the start of 1845 to around 5 million by 1849. ...read more.

Middle

During the first few years of the famine the Peel led conservative government had intervened. He set up the public works, where a man could work for 8 pence a day. However this was harsh manual labourer, and as it was very physical some died doing this, as they were so malnutrition. The theory was that as it was so harsh only those who were desperate would use it. He also imported huge quantities of maize from India. This was ground into a kind of flour, which was sold at a cut price. Many producers were angry at this arguing it was interfering with the market system. Along with this soup kitchens were provided, this mainly came from charities. ...read more.

Conclusion

These political views lead to the creation of well organised and disciplined nationalist political groups in the years that followed. Overall there were two major consequences from the Great Famine. The first was the massive decrease in the population in Ireland, and Ireland have still not returned to there pre famine population. Also the other major consequence was a hatred towards the English. The Irish felt let down by the English. As part of the Union the Irish believed that the government should have helped them. They Irish had a right to feel let down. They had been forced in to the Act of Union and they got only the downsides and none of the positives. If the government had acted then the political outlook of the Irish may not have been so anti-English. So the political aftermath was one of discontent and anti English feeling. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work