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What were the effects of the Blitz on everyday life in Britain?

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Introduction

What were the effects of the Blitz on everyday life in Britain? During the Blitz in Britain, many British citizens were affected in more than one way. People had to be aware to the sound of the air-raid siren, which meant they had to rush to either their own shelter, or a public one. A lot of people slept in the underground stations, tightly squashed among many others. Others had shelters in their own home, or in their garden. People used Morrison shelters in their own homes. These were like cages that you slept in, and were used to stop the rubble falling on to you. The Anderson shelters were built in the garden, and were larger than the Morrison shelters. A whole family could fit into an Anderson shelter; however only a few people could fit into a Morrison shelter (depending on if it was a 2 tier Morrison shelter or just a 1 tier Morrison shelter). ...read more.

Middle

The bombing of Britain by the Luftwaffe had both a positive and a negative effect on morale. Propaganda was used heavily throughout the Blitz to increase the British morale. This propaganda included: posters of smiling Brits, groups of British people working during the war, and slogans telling British people to live their lives normally, and to keep their morale up. All of this propaganda told British people that Britain was winning the war. There was no negative press, or anything to take down this morale. Source C (Edexcel - Britain in the age of total war coursework assignments booklet) shows a photograph published in on 15th September 1940. This photograph shows a group of British workers smiling with high morale. This was the sort of propaganda released during the period of the Blitz. Behind the scenes of the propaganda, however, were the devastating effects the Blitz had on people's lives. ...read more.

Conclusion

The experience of the Blitz was pretty much the same for everyone living in major cities, however in the countryside some people were not affected by the Blitz whatsoever. They could get on with their normal lives, without having the big worry of their home being destroyed. They could almost forget that a war was on, as no bombs were hitting anywhere near them. Children were evacuated to homes in the countryside, where they could get on with their lives without their family, but with a new one. The Blitz vastly affected many families throughout the country, and in many cases split them apart. Children were taken from families to live a safer life whilst their parents worked to help Britain come through the war, and many people were killed or injured. These were very emotional times, and people's morale rose and fell. However, the great British grit shone through, and Britain went on to win the war in the air and at sea. ?? ?? ?? ?? Charlie Bryant ...read more.

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