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Why did the British government decide to evacuate children from Britain(TM)s major cities at the start of the Second World War?

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Introduction

Why did the British government decide to evacuate children from Britain's major cities at the start of the Second World War? Early on in World War 2, many children along with some mothers were evacuated from major cities by the government. There are many reasons why the government decided to do this: The most obvious of these is the health and safety issues that arise from such people remaining in the cities as large scale bombings, fires and dangerous factory work, along with possible accidents as a result of the blackout, would be very dangerous. People that had been injured would also provide a large pressure on Britain's economy, putting Hospitals in highly populated areas under immense amounts of pressure. ...read more.

Middle

The British Government calculated that 100,000 tons of bombs would be dropped on London in 2 weeks, with each ton causing 50 casualties, which translates roughly to half of the children from the major cities being injured as a direct result of bombings. As well as economic pressure, there were psychological reasons for evacuation to occur, people out on the lines were to believe that their children and families back home had been evacuated and were all safe, this was to be a major morale boost for the British troops and thus would encourage them to work harder, to make sure Britain would be an o.k place for their children to grow up. The war, needed more supplies and artillery sending to the front lines as it progressed, this meant that someone back home had to work in ...read more.

Conclusion

The government also wanted to ensure a good future for Britain as a country, as they knew that many of the men were likely to be killed from fighting, they needed to keep someone in the country for after the war to run the shops, factories and other businesses, the Government knew that the future of Britain depended on the survival of the children, providing a huge motive for evacuating the Children. Overall, there were a number of factors that brought the government to decide to commit to a large scale evacuation scheme, the most important of which was the overall economic benefits, as the war simply could not have been fought by Britain without the women working in the factories of Britain. Although the health and safety benefits were very important the related benefits were even more so, such as moral boosting, and the idea that Britain would survive after the war. ...read more.

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