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Why did the British government decide to evacuate children from Britain's major cities in the early years of the Second World War?

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Introduction

Why did the British government decide to evacuate children from Britain's major cities in the early years of the Second World War? There were several reasons for the evacuation of the children from the danger of the Second World War. The British government started to get worried that another war might start again when Adolf Hitler came to power in Germany in 1933. The government was worried that British towns and cities might face bombing by German planes if the war happens. Therefore the government started making secret plans to evacuate children, mothers, pregnant women, blind and disabled people and some teachers to the less crowded areas of Britain in order to save them from injury and maybe death which was the main reason for evacuating children. ...read more.

Middle

There were some other important reasons for the evacuation of children. The British government would be in need of more munitions workers in the factories and by evacuating children women would not be worried about their children, in other words the women would not have to help their children in different daily activities. Therefore more women would be available to work in the munitions and other factories during the war. The leaders in Britain also wanted to make sure that the hospitals work properly and that they would be able to help a large amount of people during the war if not all of them, so the evacuation was a good idea because there would be less pressure on the hospitals in the major cities and towns in Britain because most of the children would be in the countryside where they are safer. ...read more.

Conclusion

An Operation was launched and most of the soldiers were rescued. At that time the towns on the east and the southeast coasts of Britain were in danger of invasion after France was defeated. Because of that a large evacuation action was taken and children were moved to safer areas. After that in July 1940 the Royal Air Force and the Luftwaffe fought the Battle of Britain and there was a fear that Hitler might think of attacking the major cities and a new wave of evacuation started to save the lives of children. The main reason of evacuation and the most important one in most cases was to save children in Britain from the bombing of the main cities and therefore saving them from death and injury. It was really important because it saved the future generations from the horrors of the Second World War. Karam Aboud 10 R2 ...read more.

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