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Why did the British Government decide to evacuate children from Britain's major cities in the early years of the Second World War?

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Introduction

Why did the British Government decide to evacuate children from Britain's major cities in the early years of the Second World War? After Germany invaded Poland in 1939, Britain and France declared war on Germany and just twenty-one years after the last one had ended, a new World War had begun. With these past twenty-one years being very tense between countries, warfare had changed, weapons that could kill many people instantly were invented and especially the warfare in the sky was much more advanced. With a ruthless dictator in power, Germany had the technology to cause millions of casualties across to Britain, especially on her home front. With fear of heavy bombing of Britain's large cities, the British government decided to evacuate the children of Britain to safety in the countryside. ...read more.

Middle

The Germans had new longer range bombers which would be harder to defend against. Over 60,000 people were killed by German bombing raids. This was very bad, but not as bad as was expected before the war. You can imagine the added numbers to the 60,000 if evacuation had not taken place. Hitler believed in very extreme politics and would go to any lengths to win the war. He thought that if Britain sustained heavy civilian casualties then eventually she would submit. This made civilians more legitimate targets, especially children who could not fend for themselves. If Hitler caused enough children to die then Britain would suffer a great emotional blow and the country's morale would be severely damaged. Britain needed to evacuate her children to give the civilians piece of mind so the war effort could run more smoothly. ...read more.

Conclusion

By Christmas 1939 half of the evacuees had returned home. By May 1940 Hitler was ready to launch a full scale attack on Britain and the "Blitz" had started on the 9th of May 1940 with an air raid on Cantebury. Evacuation was quickly reintroduced a lot quicker than in 1939 when they saw the devastation Germany could cause to Britain's cities. Evacuation was introduced for a great range of different reasons from not as important reasons such as making sure education ran smoothly to keeping the children and the future of Britain away from danger. I think this was the most important reason for evacuation because if there were many child casualties then the public's morale would have been lowered. But knowing there children are safe in the countryside puts the parents minds at ease so they can concentrate fully on winning the war and stopping the killing all together. Alex Arkley 11.30 ...read more.

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