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Youth in Nazi Germany

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Introduction

Youth in Nazi Germany Germany was in one of its strongest stances for nearly 20 years. It was this that Hitler wanted to capitalise on for the future of Nazi Germany and by doing this they need to take advantage of the young people as they are the next generation of Nazis. Using the ideas of Social Darwinism they Nazis decided that only the most strongest and ruthless should survive. This was to be the Aryan race. How was Hitler supposed to tackle such a massive task? Would it work? And what effects would it have? The Nazis would have to brainwash the German youth in every possible way. So they did, they took over the lives of the German children, and run them for them. If Hitler wanted his anticipated 1000-year regime to succeed the future generations were the children. To get people on your side you need to get them on your side when they are young, Younger people are far easier to influence than when they are adults. This is because the younger you are the more you believe other people as they are more dependant on them, and the younger generations look up to the older generations who lead by example to make the younger people the perfect Nazis. One of the main areas the youth were influenced was at school where Nazi teachers taught them. ...read more.

Middle

In 1936 all rival organizations were banned, and at the beginning of World War II in 1939 children began to be enlisted into the Hitler Youth. The system was arranged in a way that children were placed in different organisations and different special schools for political education depending to their ages; the organization took in youngsters from 15 to 18, who had their own sections of culture, press, propaganda, and sports. The intention behind all this was to indoctrinate a future generation of Aryan Nazi leaders. In the last days of the war, when the German army was broken and Hitler was cornered in his bunker, it was to the youngsters of the Hitler Youth that he turned for the defence of Berlin. By 1933 its membership was at 100,000. After Hitler came to power, all other youth groups were closed so the Hitler Youth grew quickly. In 1936, there were about 4 million members. In 1936, it became very strictly compulsory to join the Hitler Youth. Youths could avoid doing any group activity service if they paid their subscriptions but this became almost impossible after 1939. The Hitler Youth catered for 10 to 18 year olds. The idea of the boy's section was to prepare the boys for military service. Boys at 10 joined the Deutsches Jungvolk (German Young People) until they were 13 when they transferred to the Hitler Jugend (Hitler Youth) ...read more.

Conclusion

It was by far the most public, blatant and dangerous thing they did. Two of their key members Hans and his sister were arrested for throwing leaflets around in a university where they were caught and arrested by Gestapo. Some people say that they had plenty of time to escape, but instead they wanted to go down fighting. There are still many memories of the White Rose still known in Munich today. People say that the White Rose were silenced to early and that their words still live on, "freedom". I think overall what Hitler was trying to achieve with the young people would have worked only if they had longer to do it and if they had been successful in World War Two. I think it takes courage to stand up and fight for your Country, but I think it takes more courage to against it for what you believe is right. This is why I think the groups that went against Hitler were the real heroes of Germany; they were the next generation of Germany, not the Nazi Youths. They knew what was right, and they stuck with it, right to end, not giving up, and in my opinion they succeeded. They may not have played a huge role in the war but every little helps. A few thousand less Nazis, a few thousand less that had to die. This is why they were so courageous, a few thousand against millions, that takes true heroes with true courage to do that. Daniel Sibley ...read more.

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