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Collection of data to investigate the difference of two conditions.

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Introduction

Activity C: Collection of data to investigate the difference of two conditions State the hypothesis and null hypothesis for this activity. � The null hypothesis states that any difference in the ability to find words in a word search between the experimental condition and the control condition is due to chance factors. Thus, any differences in the dependant variable (number of words found in the word search) are not due to the independent variable (listening to metallica), and will be considered inconsequential, as they would be too small to take account of. � The hypothesis states that listening to metallica in the 5-minute time frame will significantly affect the participant's ability to find words in a word search. Identify the variables. Independent variable: Metallica Dependant variable: Number of words found in a word search in a limited amount of time.(5-minutes) ...read more.

Middle

� Each of the participants were given a copy of the word search -face down. � In the experimental condition the music was then put on. � The participants were then instructed to begin the word search and a countdown time of five minutes commenced. � Once the five minutes had finished the participants left and their results were recorded. Name the statistical test used to analyse your data. Mann Whitney - this was used because it was test of independent measures, using ordinal data. What were the results of your analysis. Participants Listening to metallica whilst finding words in a word search Participants in a quiet environment whilst finding words in a word search Participant Experimental Condition Control Group Number Of Words Found Rank Number Of Words Found Rank 1 6 19 2 9 2 6 19 4 15 3 1 3 2 9 4 3 13.5 3 13.5 5 1 3 5 16.5 6 5 16.5 6 ...read more.

Conclusion

The null hypothesis states that any difference in the ability to find words in a word search between the experimental condition and the control condition is due to chance factors. Thus, any differences in the dependant variable are not due to the independent variable, of listening to metallica, and will be considered inconsequential, as they would be too small to take account of. Thus the experimental hypothesis was rejected. Use this space to present data using tables, visual displays and verbal summaries. The mean average of numbers of words found in the experimental condition was 2.9, whereas in the controlled condition it was 2.8, and the range in both was from one word through to six words found. This shows that there were more words found, averagely, in the experimental condition than in the controlled condition. However, the standard deviation in the experimental condition was 1.9, as apposed to 1.6 in the controlled condition, this shows that the results were more consistent in the quiet environment than they were in the noisy environment. ...read more.

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