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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 1909

Mathematics (Statistics) Coursework: Read All About It!

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Introduction

Thomas Amendt 10KL 10A1 Mathematics (Statistics) Coursework: Read All About It! Hypotheses Tabloids have a higher percentage of space taken up by adverts than broadsheets. Tabloids have more single adverts covering over half a page than broadsheets. Tabloids have more pages with no adverts than broadsheets do. Tabloids have a greater spread of advert sizes than broadsheets do. Plan Sampling Data * I will use two broadsheet papers (the Times and the Telegraph) and two tabloid newspapers (the Daily Mail and the Mirror) * I will take a stratified sample of each newspaper depending on the number of pages there are in that paper. I will be collecting data from 20% of the number of pages in each paper. * I shall include all supplemental magazines and inserts but I will not include any leaflets found inside the paper. * To avoid bias, I will randomly select the pages I will sample by using the ran# function on a scientific calculator. This will generate a random number. * For the number of half- and full-sheet adverts (adverts that occupy over half the printable area of the page) and pages with now adverts, I will sample every page of every newspaper. This is to ensure that I will not miss any pages out. * To calculate the percentage of space an advert takes up, I will use the following formula: where 'a' equals the total area of all adverts on the page and 'p' equals the total area of the page. ...read more.

Middle

Of Pages 44 68 112 80 48 128 Pages sampled 8 14 22 16 10 26 50%>x?100% (single advert) 10 6 16 12 12 24 Pages with no adverts 9 13 22 37 15 52 Pages sampled 44 68 112 80 48 128 Cumulative Frequency Advert Coverage ? Bshts % Tblds % 0% 8 36 7 27 0%<x?10% 8 36 11 42 10%<x?20% 11 50 14 54 20%<x?30% 13 59 17 65 30%<x?40% 15 68 19 73 40%<x?50% 18 82 21 81 50%<x?60% 20 91 22 84 60%<x?70% 21 95 22 84 70%<x?80% 21 95 23 88 80%<x?90% 21 95 23 88 90%<x?100% 22 100 26 100 Percentages of other data: Advert Coverage ? Bshts (%) Tblds (%) 50%>x?100% (single advert) 14% 19% Pages with no adverts 19.5% 38.5% Pages sampled 112 128 C.F. Graph Box and Whisker diagrams Bar chart Statistics Formulae Mean: Broadsheet calculations: Tabloid Calculations: Standard Deviation: Broadsheet Calculations: -26 676 5408 -21 441 0 -11 121 363 -1 1 2 9 81 162 19 361 1083 29 841 1682 39 1521 1521 49 2401 0 59 3481 0 69 4761 4761 14982 Tabloid Calculations: -27.5 756.25 5293.75 -22.5 506.25 2025 -12.5 156.25 458.75 -2.5 6.25 18.75 7.5 56.25 112.5 17.5 306.25 612.5 27.5 756.25 756.25 37.5 1406.25 0 47.5 2256.25 2256.25 57.5 3366.25 0 67.5 4556.25 13668.75 25202.5 Statistics Statistic Broadsheets Tabloids Mean 26% 271/2% Median 20% 15% Mode 0% 0% Standard Deviation ...read more.

Conclusion

The mode is the same for tabloids and broadsheets. It is the most frequent piece of data which is 0%. This accounts for some of the low results. Standard Deviation The S.D.s for broadsheets and tabloids are similar but they are different enough to prove that my fourth hypothesis - Tabloids have a greater spread of advert sizes than broadsheets do - is accurate as the tabloid standard deviation is higher than broadsheet standard deviation. The standard deviation shows us how spread out the data is around the mean. Hypotheses * Tabloids have a higher percentage of space taken up by adverts than broadsheets. INCORRECT - according to my results they are around the same but the broadsheet average percentage is slightly higher. We can see this in the median. * Tabloids have more single adverts covering over half a page than broadsheets. INSUFFICENT EVIDENCE - the two totals for broadsheets and tabloids are close together as we can see from the bar chart. The tabloid total is higher than the broadsheet total but not by much. I think that a second test will clarify the result. * Tabloids have more pages with no adverts than broadsheets do. CORRECT - according to my results the bar for tabloids on my bar chart is significantly higher than my broadsheet result. * Tabloids have a greater spread of advert sizes than broadsheets do. CORRECT - according to my results the standard deviation and interquartile range are higher for tabloids than broadsheets. ...read more.

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