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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 1844

nespaper comparisons part 1/3

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

In this coursework, I will be selecting three newspapers. One will be a tabloid newspaper, another will be a broadsheet newspaper and my last newspaper will be one which is a mixture of both. I intend to make several comparisons between these three types of newspapers.

The newspapers I have chosen to use are the ‘The Sun’ as my tabloid newspaper, the ‘Evening Standard’ as my broadsheet newspaper and ‘Daily Mail’ as the paper in between.

For my investigation, I wish to investigate which newspaper is easier to read in comparison to each other.

I will conduct my investigation by finding out which newspaper has longer or shorter words and sentences. This is because shorter words and sentences are easier to read than longer words and sentences.

The following are the questions which I will be answering to complete my investigation;

1) Which newspaper has more letters in a word?

2) Which newspaper has more words in a sentence?

My hypothesis is that The Sun, the tabloid, will have fewer letters in a word compared to the Daily Mail which in turn would have fewer letters in a word than the broadsheet newspaper, Evening Standard.

...read more.

Middle

28

24

7

image03.png

33

35

8

image03.png

38

40

9

image00.png

39

9

10

image00.png

40

10

11

40

12

40

13

40

Total

40

40

213

Evening Standard

Number of letters per word

Tally

(Frequency)

Cumulative Frequency

Total number of letters

1

image00.png

1

2

2

image02.png

3

4

3

image01.png

7

12

4

image04.png

10

12

5

image03.png

15

25

6

image04.png

23

48

7

image01.png

27

28

8

image03.png

32

40

9

image01.png

36

36

10

image02.png

38

20

11

image00.png

39

11

12

39

13

image00.png

40

13

Total

40

40

251

The Evening Standard newspaper has a higher number of total letters than The Sun and the Daily Mail which means that the Evening Standard will have a higher mean of letters per word. This follows the prediction which I made at the beginning.

To help me understand the results more clearly, I will find out the median, mean and mode of the amount of letters per word. I predict that the Evening Standard would have a higher value than The Sun and the Daily Mail in each of these.

The median is found by writing the numbers out in ascending order of length and, in this case, finding the mean of the number of letters in the twentieth and twenty-first words.

In the Evening Standard newspaper, both the twentieth and the twenty-first words have a word length of six letters. I can see this clearly in my table as the cumulative frequency column shows me that all the words between sixteen and twenty-three have six letters. The mean of these two numbers is obviously six which give the Evening Standard newspaper a median of six letters.

...read more.

Conclusion

The Daily Mail has a range of eight and The Sun has a range of twelve.

Below I have created a cumulative frequency graph showing the cumulative frequencies of my results.

image06.png

From this graph I can tell that the interquartile range of each newspaper is.

IQR of Evening Standard is 3.6

IQR of Daily Mail is 3.1image07.png

IQR of The Sun is 4

image08.png

Using the box plots, I can make probability statements such as;

75% of the words in the evening standard have a word length of four or higher.

To work out the standard deviation for each newspaper I will be using the formula below.

image09.png

x stands for the number of letters in a word.

f stands for the frequency of x.

N stands for the sum of the frequencies which is always forty.

x-bar stands for the mean of x.

To work out the standard deviation, I have made a table.

The Sun

Daily Mail

Evening Standard

x

f

fx2

x

f

fx2

x

f

fx2

1

1

1

2

2

8

2

4

16

3

6

54

3

6

54

4

7

112

4

6

96

5

9

225

5

8

200

6

4

144

6

6

216

7

5

245

7

4

196

8

5

320

8

2

128

9

1

81

9

2

162

10

1

100

13

1

169

1

1

1

2

2

8

3

4

36

4

3

48

5

5

125

6

8

288

7

4

196

8

5

320

9

4

324

10

2

200

11

1

121

13

1

169

Using the formulaimage09.png, I will work out the standard deviation for The Sun. I have decided to work out the standard deviation to 2 decimal places.

√ (1238/40 – (202/40)2)

√ (30.95 – 5.052)

√ (30.95 – 25.5025)

√ 5.4575

2.34

The standard deviation for Daily Mail is 1.97 and the standard deviation for Evening Standard is 2.95.

The Evening Standard has the highest standard deviation and therefore the highest spread.

Next part is newspaper comparison part 2/3

...read more.

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