• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Power of Words: An Inescapable Regime.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction


The Power of Words: An Inescapable Regime

Cindy Kou

TOK 11, Blk C

Ms Patton

Thursday 10 April 2003

(Word Count: 1464)

“Words are more treacherous and powerful than we think,” said Jean-Paul Sartre. Rudyard Kipling concurs with the quote, “Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind.” These characteristics of the nature of words conjure an image of deceit and diabolism, which initially seem unfit to describe the tools and messengers of daily communication. If these tools, indispensable to mankind in the acquisition of Knowledge, do indeed lie and deceive, there is reason to question the validity of information obtained through the use of words. To investigate the affects of words on different Areas of Knowledge, this dissertation discusses the varied implications concealed within a statement as well as the impacts of words and such implications on the studies of ethics, history, mathematics and natural sciences.

Prior to commencing, it is necessary to identify what is meant by Sartre’s use of the term “words”. If words are designated symbols or sounds that, together, convey a message, then words encompass written and spoken language and their reciprocals, read and heard language, respectively.

...read more.

Middle

Along with the development of a sense of self comes the growth of a sense of ethics. Although learning the difference between right and wrong is frequently manifested through a material rewards-and-punishment system, it is the maturity of self-esteem and ethics that becomes a pair of glasses through which one filters life. In the short term, this filter impacts one’s acquisition of knowledge. However, in the case of an author, a journalist, a storyteller or a record-keeper – in short, any individual who uses words to leave a memory of his or her life – these filters ultimately effect how future generations see the past.

        When historians study the past, their only tools are the surviving memories of someone else’s perceptions. Whether this takes the form of a documentary, a newspaper, a song or an interview, historians have no choice but to accept as valid the information that they are given. From the data gathered, the historian then formulates a theory that, if deemed reasonable and true by a collective group, is reproduced and repeated to students and scholars that follow.

...read more.

Conclusion

In some ways, words are more treacherous and powerful than I had thought. However, words are essential in the acquisition of Knowledge and it is impossible to accurately or logically use words to describe or investigate the use of words. Even in the opinion of Zen Buddhism, a philosophy that has attached great importance to silence, words are necessary to convey knowledge. Treacherous and deceitful as words may be, there is no alternative to gain or record knowledge, and without a database of accumulated knowledge, the quantity of information in the Areas of Knowledge diminishes with the parting of each soul. As of today’s level of knowledge, deceitful and misleading as words may be, there is no choice but to use them.  

Works Cited:

Irwin, William, et al. The Simpsons and Philosophy: The D’Oh! of Homer.

« Language. » The Merriam-Webster Dictionary of Quotations. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, Inc., 1992.

« Word. » The New Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Springfield: Merriam-Webster, Inc., 1992.

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Comparing length of words in newspapers section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Comparing length of words in newspapers essays

  1. memory. This experiment is a replication of the 1973 study conducted by Gordon ...

    Thank you for participating in our experiment. You man now leave and return to class. WORD LIST TEST Group 4 1._________________ 2._________________ 3._________________ 4._________________ 5._________________ 6._________________ 7._________________ 8._________________ 9._________________ 10.________________ Group 1 1._________________ 2._________________ 3._________________ 4._________________ 5._________________ 6._________________ 7._________________ 8._________________ 9._________________ 10.________________ Group 6 1._________________ 2._________________ 3._________________ 4._________________ 5._________________ 6._________________

  2. "Words are more treacherous and powerful than we think." Evaluate the extent to which ...

    Gossip is very powerful, and does not only hurt the person who is the object of it, but can also hurt the person who is told the gossip. There is a modern day example that can be used to illustrate this effect.

  1. Effects of acid rain in germination and growth of mustard seeds

    Colour of leaves - All green All green Dark green Length of stem / � 0,1cm - 1,3 / 2 / 1,3 / 1 / 1 / 0,7 / 1 2.5 / 2,5 / 3 / 2 / 3 / 2,5 / 2,5 2,5 / 2,8 / 2,6 / 3,4

  2. Assesment of Reading Difficulties in Patient AM Following the Development of Vascular Dementia.

    Although AM maintains the ability to read single words accurately an attentional deficit must occur at this level in some form causing him difficulty in attending to just a single word. This is shown in his average time of 7 minutes and 38 seconds to read the words extracted from

  1. Modes of Modern English Vocabulary Development

    For example, mass-produce is from mass production, and ghost-write is from ghost-writer. What we talked about so far is restricted to two-stem compounds. There are many compounds which contain more than two stems. In mass media we may often come across expressions like a middle-of-the-road politician, ahead-of-schedule general election.

  2. Are High Imagery Words Easier To Retrieve From The Short Term Memory Than Abstract ...

    He proposed a dual-coding theory to account for the effects of images on verbal learning. This consists of a non-verbal system that processes information about objects and events and a verbal system that processes speech and reading. Within the verbal system words are represented by a logogen and images are represented an imagens.

  1. The aim of the research is to find out whether or not interference does ...

    He/She had the colour words and neutral words time taken for participants on the same table but different columns. PROCEDURE In this experiment the experimenter did a pilot study to make sure the experiment actually works. The experimenter picked someone by opportunity sampling this is where the experimenter just picked

  2. AMBIGUITY IN LANGUAGE

    Homonym: When different words are pronounced, and possibly spelled, the same way (examples: to, too, two; or bat the animal, bat the stick, and bat as in the bat the eyelashes) Homophone: Where the pronunciation is the same (or close, allowing for such phonological variation as comes from accent)

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work