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  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: Maths
  • Word count: 3515

To prove that out of town shopping is becoming increasingly popular with shoppers, and that it can compete with existing shops in the town centre.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Geography Coursework:

OUT OF TOWN SHOPPING

AIM: To prove that out of town shopping is becoming increasingly popular with shoppers, and that it can compete with existing shops in the town centre.

HYPOTHESIS: Shoppers are leaving the town centre and opting to visit the out of town centre instead. At least one of these can be found in almost every town in Britain. I believe this is because of many different factors such as working trends and increased mobility.

SHOPPING IN THE 1960’s & 1970’s

During the 60’s and 70’s there were 4 main types of shops and shopping centres that could be found in British towns and cities. This can be shown in a simple hierarchy.

Highordercentre (usually one)

                                         Sells: comparison, luxury and

                               Specialist goods                      

Middle order centre (usually several)

                                        Sell: a mixture of convenience and specialist goods                    

Low order centre (many)

Sell: convenience goods

The city centre (CBD):

It was the area that contained the most shops and shoppers. There were all the department stores, such as Debenhams and supermarkets that could afford the high land prices. Also there were many clothes and shoes shops, so people did comparison-shopping, where people could compare between different styles and prices. Also in town centres there are usually specialist stores (jewellery, furniture, electrical goods) and small food shops.

Secondary shopping centres:

These were usually a line of shops that supplemented the town centre, normally on a main road leading into the town centre. These secondary shopping centres had cheaper land prices than in the town centres, with easier parking and access that took advantage of incoming traffic. These shops relied mostly on impulse buying from newsagents and convenience shops. They also contained fast-food take aways, florists, car showrooms and petrol stations.

Suburban shopping parades:

...read more.

Middle

30+                Total 3        12 %                2 hrs +        Total 2        8 %

40+                Total 1        4 %

50+                Total 1        4 %                6) Transport:

60+                Total 2        8 %                Walk                Total 8        32 %

70+                Total 0        0 %                Bus                Total 5        20 %

                                                Car                Total 11        44 %

  1. Sex                                        Taxi                Total 1        4 %

Male                Total 9        36 %

Female         Total 16        64 %

  1. Area:

Caldmore                Total 3        12 %

Delves                Total 1        4 %

Palfrey                Total 4        16 %

Pleck                        Total 2        8 %

Highgate                Total 2        8 %

Bescot                Total 6        24 %

Park Hall                Total 1        4 %

Chuckery                Total 1        4 %

Birchills                Total 2        8 %

Pelsall                Total 1        4 %

Wednesbury        Total 1        4 %

Rushall                Total 1        4 %

  1. Shops:

JJB                        Total 8        9.1 %

Sports Division        Total 9        10.2 %

Matalan                Total 14        15.9 %

Halfords                Total 3        3.4 %

Comet                Total 10        11.4 %

McDonalds                Total 14        15.9 %

Carpet Right                Total 4         4.5 %

Pets at Home        Total 4        4.5 %

Moben                Total 2        2.4%

Textile World        Total 4        4.5 %

Farmfoods                Total 16        18.2 %

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For Saturday 5:30pm

  1. Age:                                        5) Time:

15-                Total 3        12 %                15-30 min        Total 4        16 %

15-20        Total 9        36 %                30 min-1 hr        Total 11        44 %

20+                Total 4        16 %                1-2 hrs        Total 8        32 %

30+                Total 3        12 %                2 hrs +        Total 2        8 %

40+                Total 4        16 %                

50+                Total 2        8 %                6) Transport:

60+                Total 0        0 %                Walk                Total 6        24 %

70+                Total 0        0 %                Bus                Total 8        32

                                                Car                Total 11        44 %

  1. Sex                                        Taxi                Total 0        0 %

...read more.

Conclusion

My investigation did everything that I thought it would, it helped me to find how popular Besot shopping centre is.

I found my Car count to be the most useful piece of data and the question about what shops the respondent would visit to be least useful.

Information about why people were visiting the shopping centre would have been useful as would have been information about if people preferred shopping centres to town centres. I could do another survey including questions about the above useful information. I also would do more surveys and car counts at other out of town shopping centres.

The way my data was collected was limited because the surveys were carried out one at a time so there was not a true representation of the people visiting the shopping centre.

‘Town Centres Fighting Back.’

(See Newspaper Article and Map of town Centre)

Since I began my study the following news story appeared in a local paper. The story is about an analyst company that has published a report that predicts that the town centre shops are going to go into a period of shortfall if the town centre isn’t ‘regenerated’. They are blaming this on the Walsall Council and on how in the past they have given out of town shopping centres planning permission. The company is suggesting that the council should not allow any more shopping centres to be built. It is likely that the council will take this suggestion on board, as there is a new shopping centre development being made in the town centre at the moment.

                                                                                   

...read more.

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